Description: COAT-ARM Hastings District Council

 

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East, Hastings

Phone:  (06) 871 5000

Fax:  (06) 871 5100

WWW.hastingsdc.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

Open

 

A G E N D A

 

 

Community Development Committee MEETING

 

 

 

Meeting Date:

Tuesday, 26 February 2019

Time:

1.00pm

Venue:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East

Hastings

 

Committee Members

Chair: Councillor Dixon

Mayor Hazlehurst

Councillors Barber, Harvey  (Deputy Chair), Heaps, Lawson, Lyons, Kerr, Nixon, O’Keefe, Poulain, Redstone, Schollum, Travers and Watkins (Quorum = 8)

Officer Responsible

Group Manager: Economic Growth & Organisation Improvement and Group Manager: Community Facilities & Programmes

Committee Secretary

Carolyn Hunt (Ext 5634)

 


Community Development  Committee – Terms of Reference

 

Fields of Activity

The development of policy and the oversight of operations in the area of the social, economic, cultural and environmental wellbeing and development of the District, including (but not limited to) the following activities:

Economic Development

·         Development of the Council’s overarching strategies for Environmental Management, Economic Development, Growth Management and Urban Development;

·         District development and land use planning (high level strategy)

·         Urban design and development (including CBD planning)

·         Hastings City Centre Development

·         Landmarks Activities

·         Parks and Reserves

·         Economic & Business Development programmes

·         Regional development

 

Social Development

·         Development of the Council’s overarching strategies for Social and Cultural activities

·         Housing for the elderly

·         Cemeteries (including physical works)

·         Youth

·         Arts, Culture and Heritage including the Hastings City Art Gallery

·         Democracy, civil society, community engagement and partnership

·         Social Development and wellbeing programmes

·         Guilin Sister City Relationship

·         Local and community events and celebrations

·         Historic commemorations

·         Citizenship activities

·         Civic Honours Awards

·         Grants, Funding and allocations

·         Library operations

·         Hawkes Bay Opera House

·         Recreation Facilities other than Parks & Reserves

·         Recreation activities

 

Other roles of a strategic overview nature including:

·         Other policy development not otherwise provided for

Membership (Mayor and 14 Councillors)

Chairman appointed by Council

Deputy Chairman appointed by Council

The Mayor

All other Councillors

 

Quorum – 8 members

 

DELEGATED POWERS:

General Delegations

1.       Authority to exercise all of Council powers, functions and authorities (except where prohibited by law or otherwise delegated to another committee) in relation to all matters detailed in the Fields of Activity.

2.       Authority to re-allocate funding already approved by the Council as part of the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan process, for matters within the Fields of Activity provided that the re-allocation of funds does not increase the overall amount of money committed to the Fields of Activity in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan.

3.       Authority to develop and adopt goals, strategies and policies on behalf of the Council for matters within the Fields of Activity.  

4.       Responsibility to monitor Long Term Plan/Annual Plan implementation within the Fields of Activity set out above.

5.       Authority to re-allocate funding already approved by the Council as part of the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan process, for matters within the Fields of Activity provided that the re-allocation of funds does not increase the overall amount of money committed to the Fields of Activity in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan.

6.       Authority to develop and adopt goals, strategies and policies on behalf of the Council for matters within the Fields of Activity.  

7.       Responsibility to monitor Long Term Plan/Annual Plan implementation within the Fields of Activity set out above.

Cemeteries

8        Authority to exercise all of the Council’s powers, functions, and duties under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and any other statute or regulation relating to the control and management of the burial or cremation of the dead within Hastings District (other than the review of bylaws, which is the responsibility of the Strategy Planning and Partnerships Committee).

 

Parks, Reserves and Walkways

 

9.       Authority to exercise all of the Council’s powers and functions under the Reserves Act 1977 in respect of parks and reserves other than the review of bylaws.

10.     Authority to hear submissions under s120 (1)(c) of the Reserves Act 1977 in relation to all reserves or to appoint a commissioner or commissioners to hear submissions and to make a recommendation in respect of those objections or submissions to the Committee.

11.     Authority to determine names for or to change the name of, parks and reserves owned or administered by the Council.

12.     Where the Council is appointed as the controlling authority of a walkway under the New Zealand Walkways Act 1990, authority to exercise the powers of the controlling authority.

 

Bylaws

 

13.     Authority to monitor any Council bylaws relating to matters within the Fields of Activity and to recommend any amendments or additions to those bylaws to the Strategy Planning and Partnerships Committee for review and consideration.


 


 

HASTINGS DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

Community Development Committee MEETING

 

Tuesday, 26 February 2019

 

VENUE:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East

Hastings

TIME:

1.00pm

 

A G E N D A

 

 

 

1.         Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

Leave of Absence had previously been granted to Councillor Kerr

2.         Conflict of Interest

Members need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a Member of the Council and any private or other external interest they might have.  This note is provided as a reminder to Members to scan the agenda and assess their own private interests and identify where they may have a pecuniary or other conflict of interest, or where there may be perceptions of conflict of interest. 

If a Member feels they do have a conflict of interest, they should publicly declare that at the start of the relevant item of business and withdraw from participating in the meeting.  If a Member thinks they may have a conflict of interest, they can seek advice from the General Counsel or the Democratic Support Manager (preferably before the meeting). 

It is noted that while Members can seek advice and discuss these matters, the final decision as to whether a conflict exists rests with the member.

3.         Confirmation of Minutes

Minutes of the Community Development Committee Meeting held Tuesday 6 November 2018.

(Previously circulated)

4.         Toi Tu Hawke's Bay - Strategic Framework 2019-2021: Presentation of High Level Implementation Plan and Budget                                                                7

5.         Hawke's Bay Opera House Precinct Fundraising Campaign Proposal Presentation                                                                                                                 9

6.         Presentation of Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan 11

7.         Residential Development Status Update                                                           33

8.         Industrial Development Status Update                                                               55

9.         Hastings District Libraries: Prison Programmes update                               61

10.       Multicultural Strategy - Update                                                                              65

11.       Youth Employment Update                                                                                    71

12.       Additional Business Items

13.       Extraordinary Business Items 

14.       Recommendation to Exclude the Public from Item 15                                    97

15.       Strategic Projects Team 2018/19 Work Programme Update

 

     


File Ref: 18/1261

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Hastings City Art Gallery Director

Toni MacKinnon

SUBJECT:                    Toi Tu Hawke's Bay - Strategic Framework 2019-2021: Presentation of High Level Implementation Plan and Budget        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to inform the Community Development Committee on the proposed high level implementation plan for the Toi Tu Hawke’s Bay Strategic Framework 2019-2021.

1.2       Strategy writer Karl Wixon and Project Lead Toni Mackinnon will present the plan and proposed budget for Council’s consideration and response.

 

2.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)      That the report of the Hastings City Art Gallery Director titled Toi Tu Hawke's Bay - Strategic Framework 2019-2021: Presentation of High Level Implementation Plan and Budget dated 26/02/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/109

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Group Manager: Community Facilities & Programmes

Alison Banks

SUBJECT:                    Hawke's Bay Opera House Precinct Fundraising Campaign Proposal Presentation        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee on the proposed Opera House Precinct Fundraising Campaign.

1.2       The Opera House Precinct Sub Committee is responsible for monitoring community engagement and fundraising for this project and has been kept informed on progress to date.

1.3       The Opera House Sub Committee have requested that the wider Council be informed of the proposal.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       Jessica Soutar Barron has been engaged by Council to support the Opera House Project Team with Community Engagement and Fundraising Strategy to raise funds for the Hastings District Municipal Building Redevelopment

 

3.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Project Advisor titled “Hawke’s Bay Opera House Precinct Fundraising Campaign Proposal Presentation” dated 26/02/2019 be received.

 


File Ref: 18/1273

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Parks Planning and Development Manager

Rachel Stuart

SUBJECT:                    Presentation of Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to present the Draft Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan (separately circulated) that has been jointly prepared by Urbanismplus and Council.   

1.2       This request arises from a resolution of Council in the adoption of the Long Term Plan 2018-28 (LTP) that Officers prepare a project plan that identifies and prioritises key activation areas that would best achieve the goals of the 2013-33 Hastings City Centre Strategy (City Centre Strategy) and fit within the parameters of the Long Term Plan focus areas and budget, including consideration of the reintroduction of vehicles to the Central Plaza.

1.3       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       The objective of this decision relevant to the purpose of Local Government is the provision of quality areas of open space; and to give effect to the goals and objectives included in the City Centre Strategy and LTP to improve the vibrancy and amenity of the Hastings City Centre.

1.5       This report concludes by recommending that the Committee receive the Draft Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan; and (a) adopt as circulated; or (b) adopt with any amendments requested.  

2.0       BACKGROUND

Long Term Plan 2018-28

2.1       The consultation document for the LTP was released to the public in May 2018.  It identified key areas of focus and investment, including ‘investment in the Hastings city centre to increase its vibrancy and to meet the challenges of changing retail patterns and how people use the central city’. 

2.2       The document identified that a competitive and attractive city centre is key for Council; reflecting the desire of the community identified in the City Centre Strategy for a strong vibrant, compact and resilient city centre with a strong sense of place, high in amenity and reflective of our culture and heritage.

2.3       Three areas within the city centre were identified in the LTP as the first priorities for Council investment of $4.5m to achieve this vision: (1) Central Plaza; (2) Heretaunga Street East Entertainment Precinct; and (3) Civic Square.  Descriptions and illustrations of what these spaces could look like were provided to the community for feedback.

2.4       Feedback on the LTP consultation document relating to the city centre investment package was generally positive, with support received for both the priority areas and design initiatives.

2.5       It was during this submission process that it was requested that Council give further consideration to the reinstatement of traffic over the railway line and through the Central Plaza.  It was mooted that this should be considered prior to making significant investment in that area.  Whilst community appetite for traffic reinstatement was low during the preparation of the City Centre Strategy, it was acknowledged that the matter may need to be reassessed in the future.

2.6       Following the consideration of submissions, Council adopted the amended LTP, including the investment package and priority areas for the city centre, in June 2018.  At that time, Council also resolved to prepare a project plan that would identify and prioritise key activation areas that would achieve the goals of the City Centre Strategy, fit within the parameters of the LTP focus areas and budget, and investigate the return of vehicles to the Central Plaza.

2.7       In July 2018 Council engaged Urbanismplus to assist with the preparation of the project plan, resulting in this Draft City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan.

Preparation of the City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan

2.8       To identify and refine the projects designed to improve the city’s open spaces, Urbanismplus facilitated a series of workshops with stakeholders, developers, and business and building owners in August, September and November 2018. These workshops specifically looked at what was working, what needed improvement, what a vibrant space could look like, and how to best link the east and west sides of the city.

2.9       This engagement and feedback formed an integral part of the process, providing further valuable insight into the views of key stakeholders. 

2.10    Traffic modelling was undertaken in order to further explore vehicle movements within the city centre under a variety of scenarios.

2.11    The feedback confirmed that the goals, vision and priorities set out in the City Centre Strategy and LTP remain relevant and are supported, and that there is an overwhelming desire that Council progress investment in the city centre.

2.12    Feedback was also sought from the Youth Council, which requested consideration of a number of initiatives, specifically focused on the provision of youth spaces and facilities: places to learn, collaborate, create and perform; space for the provision of youth social services; streetscape ideas, free Wi-Fi, youth-focused pop up shops, and the upgrade of Civic Square with an overall focus on sustainability.

2.13    A number of key themes were identified during the workshops, in the main consistent with those identified by the community in the preparation of the city centre strategy.  These have been summarised into the following key points:

·     Activity in the City: Enhance and provide outdoor dining and hospitality areas; encourage activity in the evenings

·     Culture in the City: Celebration of culture and provision of art

·     Narratives of the City: Tell our story; recognise cultural narratives, our stories and memories in the design

·     Play in the City: Provide youth spaces; spaces where children can play; where adults can interact

·     Nature in the City: Enhance and create green infrastructure; plant more trees and create more green spaces

·     Gateways into the City: Enhance the entrances into our city; improve route legibility and welcome

·     Access to the City: Encourage alternative transport options into the city; cycle lanes and cycle storage

·     Connections around the City: Enhance the east and west connections; the Civic Square and city centre connections; provide more laneways

·     People in the City: Put people at the heart of the city centre; address the vehicle/pedestrian balance

·     Sustainability in the City: Make Hastings a sustainable city; solar power initiatives  

2.14    Differing opinions were received with regard to the reinstatement of traffic across the Heretaunga St Railway line and through the Central Plaza. The Landmarks Trust, arts and cultural community and members of the Hastings City Business Association were opposed to the idea. That response was consistent with the results of community consultation undertaken during the preparation of the City Centre Strategy in 2013.

2.15    While there was some support for the initiative from some developers, there was also recognition that the cost and timeframes associated with further investigating the proposal may halt progress. The general preference was to move forward with investment to achieve vibrancy in the first instance.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan

3.1       The Draft City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan (the Revitalisation Plan) has been prepared in response to the above. It will assist in the delivery over the next five years of key projects identified in the City Centre Strategy; and has been prepared to align with the LTP budget, and is informed by the Hastings Urban Design Strategy 2010.

3.2       The projects specifically relate to the provision and enhancement of attractive and inviting public open spaces in the city centre. Together with a number of other Council initiatives, these projects will contribute to further positive improvement in the vibrancy of the city.

3.3       The city centre includes a network of pubic open spaces: parks, the Central Plaza, streets, pedestrian links, laneways and footpaths, all providing space for people to relax, engage and be entertained.

3.4       Many of these spaces are currently underused with limited facilities and amenity. In many cases they are used simply as thoroughfares and their design, location and quality contribute little to the vibrancy of the city.

3.5       These spaces should be the focal point for community social interaction, and their development provides Council with the opportunity to enhance visitor experience; encouraging people to visit, stay longer, and return.

3.6       The scope of this Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan extends to the enhancement and development of the following Public Spaces:

·      Green Spaces

·      Hospitality Spaces

·      Laneways and Pedestrian Links

·      Street Upgrades

·      Street Amenity Improvements

3.7       The purpose of the Revitalisation Plan is to assist with the improvement of the performance of the city centre through urban design initiatives, thereby creating a distinctive city centre that attracts people.

3.8       To achieve this, it dovetails with traffic and parking initiatives designed to make the city easier to access; and with economic initiatives which focus on promoting business in the city centre.

3.9       The Revitalisation Plan identifies a total of 23 Proposed Activation Areas and Projects within the city centre as identified in Figure 5 and Map 4 of the Revitalisation Plan in Attachment 1 and identified in Table 1 below:


 

 

Area

Project

Description

1

Central Plaza

 

1a

Central Plaza Pocket Parks

 

1b

Central Plaza: Heretaunga St West 100  

2

Heretaunga St East Hospitality Precinct

 

2a

Heretaunga St East 100

 

2b

Heretaunga St East 200

 

2c

Heretaunga St East 300 Pocket Park

 

2d

Heretaunga St East 300

3

Heretaunga St West Amenity Improvements

 

3a

Heretaunga St West 300

 

3b

Heretaunga St West 200

4

Railway Road Entrance Gateway

 

4a

Southern Car park Gateway & Pedestrian Link

 

4b

Railway Road Corridor Enhancements

 

4c

Eastbourne Street—Railway Road Street Upgrade

5

Civic Square

6

Karamu Road Precinct and Entrance Gateway

 

6a

Karamu Road (St Aubyn—Heretaunga Street)

 

6b

Karamu Road (Heretaunga—Eastbourne) Precinct

7

Pocket Parks

 

7a

Landmarks Square Extension

 

7b

King Street North Pocket Park

 

7c

Albert Square

8

Laneways and Accessibility Connections

 

8a

Heretaunga St West Laneways

 

8b

Heretaunga St East Laneways

9

Street Upgrades

 

9a

Eastbourne Street Upgrade

 

9b

King Street Upgrade

 

9c

Market Street Upgrade

 

9d

Hastings Street (Opera House Precinct)

Table 1: Proposed Activation Areas and Projects

3.10    Each of the 23 individual projects are described in the Revitalisation Plan; and include concept plans and illustrations of what these spaces could look like.  These are each summarised below.

Project 1: Central Plaza

Project 1a – Central Plaza Pocket Parks

3.11    Improvement works are proposed to the two green open spaces in the Central Plaza to increase amenity and liveliness, encouraging people to spend more time in the area.  The vision is to create an urban oasis where people gather, rest, socialise and play.    This is consistent with the plans included in the LTP Consultation Document.

3.12    There is a focus on adding elements that would enliven the two green spaces to the sides of the fountain. It is recommended that a more durable weather-resistant surface be laid in front of the stage, with a giant chess set and improved seating areas around the existing trees.    On the southern side the area around the sheep sculptures would benefit from being grassed, and a large sculptural play feature over a durable surface suitable for children’s play is recommended.  The addition of play spaces into the plaza would provide further reason for people to visit and encourage them to stay longer.

3.13    The development of these two areas could be implemented within the existing allocated budgets immediately.

Project 1b – Heretaunga Street West 100

3.14    The Heretaunga Street West 100 block, commonly known as the central plaza or mall, is home to the water feature, artworks, seating and a large paved space used for gatherings, markets and other community events.

3.15    It is a well-established and dedicated pedestrian gathering place with the Long Term Plan proposing further activation and enhancement to continue to develop it as a ‘people-orientated space’.  It was during this submission process, however, Council was asked to consider the reinstatement of traffic over the railway and through the mall prior to further investing in the area.

3.16    A number of options that may provide improved connectivity between the Central Plaza and surrounding streets and car parks were closely considered, with those Options identified in Section 1b of the Plan.

Options C-G: Carpark connections and one-way traffic

3.17    Analysis identified that while the options connecting the car parks and adjacent streets on either side of the Central Plaza would be helpful for vehicle access, they would not address the east-west severance as they would not reconnect the two ends of Heretaunga Street. They could also be seen as having a negative effect on the pedestrian-oriented spaces around the fountain.

3.18    Consideration was also given to the introduction of one-way traffic to some or all of these new connections and through the central mall.  Analysis found that this would not be helpful for route legibility within the city centre, and was too little change to warrant the cost to implement.

Option B: Through traffic through the Central Plaza

3.19    This option would see the railway crossing and central plaza re-opened to two-way traffic, restoring Heretaunga St as Hastings’ vehicular spine.

3.20    Previous analysis carried out as part of the 2010 Urban Issues project found that the severance of Heretaunga Street by the creation of the dedicated pedestrian mall in the 100 West block was considered to have negatively impacted retail vitality. It was also considered that reinstating traffic through the plaza could assist with passive security surveillance outside of business hours.   At that time Council resolved not to pursue this further, given the high cost, the uncertainty of a positive outcome and community opposition.

3.21    Since the 2010 study, retail conditions on the eastern side of the railway line have improved, as indicated by the decrease in commercial vacancies and increase in boutique retail and unique food and beverage outlets, particularly in the 100 and 200 east blocks.

3.22    It is considered that this option would have a significant negative impact on the public open space quality of the street with the loss of the pedestrian plaza and fountain. It also has the potential to attract ‘through-route’ traffic rather than the desired destination-based traffic.

3.23    It would however improve route legibility in the city centre for both pedestrians and motorists, contribute to liveliness and security after business hours, and improve access to shops within the central plaza during business hours if associated carparks were provided.

3.24    This option would also require the removal of the fountain and the installation of a vehicle crossing over the rail line.

3.25    The removal of the water feature would allow the Heretaunga St footpaths on either side of the railway line, as well as Russell St, to be straightened. As well as allowing vehicle access to through the mall, the direct sightlines along these routes would help route legibility for pedestrians.

3.26    KiwiRail has advised that this option would require an application for a new at-grade vehicle crossing in the position of the existing fountain.  Nationally, KiwiRail is determined to reduce the number of level crossing throughout New Zealand through closures and grade separations.  Its current policy states: ‘No new level crossings can be formed over the rail network. Only in exceptional circumstances will KiwiRail permit a new level crossing to be introduced over the rail network’.   KiwiRail is unwilling to consider the merits or otherwise of such a proposal without receipt of a full feasibility study, traffic impact assessment, risk analysis, reasons why an at grade separation option is not possible, and whether there are any other level crossings that may be able to be closed in favour of creation of any new level crossing.

3.27    Further consideration of this option would also require full public consultation, most appropriately as part of the Long Term Plan three-year review in 2021.

3.28    Public consultation on the City Centre Plan showed the community’s appetite for the reintroduction of traffic to the central plaza to be low, particularly if it resulted in the loss of the fountain. While the recent consultation during the preparation of the Revitalisation Plan provided mixed feedback on the reinstatement of traffic through the plaza, there was an overwhelming desire to see additional high quality lively public open spaces within the city centre.

3.29    On balance, given KiwiRail’s costly and time-consuming at-grade rail crossing application process, limited community support, loss of considerable public open space, and the high capital costs with uncertain benefits of the alternate options, Option A is recommended and detailed in the Revitalisation Plan, and described below.  

Option A: Further activation of the Central Plaza as a pedestrian space

3.30    In this option, the central plaza and fountain remain an iconic and unique people-focused feature celebrated as the heart of the city - a gathering point for community and civic functions.

3.31    Recommended changes are predominantly focused on the improvement of pedestrian links between the east and west sectors of the city, principally by improving sight-lines and visual connections and reducing the perceived walking distances.

3.32    The central plaza is currently characterised by a large expanse of paving with numerous vertical elements including trees, artworks and lights. While individually all of these contribute to the character of the area, together they reduce route legibility and sightlines through the Plaza to the two sides of Heretaunga St.

3.33    The Revitalisation Plan proposes a reduction and reorganisation of some of these features to create a clear route down the centre of the mall, lined on either side with trees and the continuation of the feature snake lights. These would align with those on the roads at both ends. This would reopen the vista from the west through the plaza to the east blocks and Te Mata Peak in the distance, and strengthen the sense of place and connection.

3.34    Additional seating areas would be provided in this area, both permanent and temporary, as well as areas of landscaping to encourage social interaction, entertainment and evening use.

3.35    It is also suggested that the size of the fountain be reduced by approximately a third. This has several benefits, including improved connectivity and opportunities to improve vibrancy.

3.36    With regard to connectivity, it would make the walk between the east and west sectors a straight line, removing the perception of the fountain as a barrier, and open up the sight-lines between the two sectors.

3.37    With regard to vibrancy, it would provide an opportunity to redevelop the fountain with seating edges, allowing better interaction of the public with the water feature, and the installation of interactive water jets in the enlarged paving area.

3.38    This project would have the added benefit of allowing Council to address the 30-plus year-old fountain’s infrastructure issues that have, over the last several years, resulted in rising maintenance requirements.

3.39    There would also be other positive benefits from reducing the size of the fountain, allowing the Heretaunga St East and Russell S intersection to be straightened to improve its route legibility, and also provide additional pavement space for outdoor dining areas on the enlarged corner areas that would result.

3.40    Redevelopment within the central mall would allow space for further elements, such as increased outdoor dining areas and strategically placed relocatable kiosks able to be used as pop up stalls, information stands, or markets. They could be positioned in the pocket parks to further activate these spaces; placed to ensure they did not obscure the views across the city to Te Mata Peak.

3.41    Of most benefit, Option A seems to have the support of the wider community, with existing funds already allocated to enable the enhancement work to commence immediately.  This option is recommended in the Revitalisation Plan.


 

Project 2. Heretaunga Street Hospitality Precinct

3.42    Project 2 relates to the three Heretaunga Street East blocks (100 – 300) that in recent years have developed as arguably the city centre’s main hospitality destination. 

3.43    The vision for these three blocks (100 – 300) is to introduce urban design strategies and high amenity elements that support a vibrant, welcoming Heretaunga Street East.

3.44    It is proposed that activation of the street be encouraged by enabling activity on widened pavements.  Kerb build-outs can provide space for amenities and activity, allowing both the inner and outer edges to be used by cafes.  The palette would be limited to a cohesive suite of quality materials which reinforce the local character and existing street scene.

3.45    These spaces would be identified by a different style and colour of paving. Street furniture and planters would provide a buffer between these spaces and moving traffic. The furniture would be located in the parking/tree zone so pedestrians would be able to continue walking along the footpath without obstruction.

3.46    The introduction of permanent pergola or veranda-like structures that could support fairy lights, foliage, canvas or even solar panels, are supported but need to be carefully designed and considered against the potential to obscure views of heritage buildings and façade and importance to not detract from the character and form of the streetscape. It may be prudent to invest in other low cost weather protection devices in the short term such as high quality umbrellas to assess the success of these spaces prior to further investment in permanent structures.  Such measures will also require full involvement and support of the associated businesses as to their preferences.

3.47    The total number of proposed new kerb build-outs and associated loss of parking bays is summarised in Table 2 below.  The total loss of up to 9 parking bays in the East 100 – 300 blocks would slightly move the balance of the street in favour of pedestrians reducing the total on-street carparking provision from 59 down to 50.   However a focus on greatly improving links between Council’s central city off-street car parks and the main activity areas will improve access to parking overall.  

 

Block

Proposed New Kerb-Build Outs

Existing Parking Bays

Proposed Loss

Total New Provision

100 East

2

20

5

15

200 East

1

17

2

15

300 East

1

22

2

20

TOTAL

4

59

9

50

Table 2: Heretaunga Street East Kerb Build-Out Parking Implications

 

3.48    In addition to the kerb build-outs, it is proposed to improve the amenity and usability of existing build-out areas, to further activate these spaces.  Furniture and planters will be added to these areas to provide for outdoor dining, informal seating and rest spots.

3.49    It is also proposed to enhance a wide portion of footpath on the corner of Warren and Heretaunga Street East to create a small pocket park.  This large space currently has three trees and two bikes stands and is underutilised. It is of a good size and orientation, therefore offering an ideal opportunity for a public space that could be used to pause, rest and socialise.

3.50    The concept plan proposes the installation of planters with edges suitable for sitting on, with grass and trees providing visual interest and softening, shading and wind protection. A pergola would give further prominence to the space and planters would provide a buffer between this space and moving traffic.

3.51    The development of new kerb build-outs, enhancement of existing build-outs and creation of small pocket park in these three blocks could be implemented within the existing allocated budgets immediately.  It is recommended that these works are the first priority, to coincide with the opening of the Opera House in November 2019.

Project 3: Heretaunga Street West Amenity Improvements

3.52    Heretaunga Street West functions as the city centre’s main retail destination with a component of hospitality businesses.

3.53    The 200 and 300 blocks feature brick paved footpaths and on-street parking in a combination of angled and parallel arrangements.  On street corners and at crossing points in these blocks there are kerb build-outs that are useful for pedestrians waiting to cross. The narrowing of the street at these points also helps to calm traffic.

3.54    However, these spaces are currently somewhat under-used and could play a more important role for pedestrians.

3.55    It is proposed that seating, planters and vegetation be introduced to these existing areas. Some would provide public seating for rest and social interaction, while others could accommodate outdoor dining associated with one or more food and beverage outlets.  As well as benefitting food businesses, outdoor dining adds to the vibrancy of the street and invites people to spend more time in the area, in turn benefitting other businesses.

Project 4: Railway Road Entrance Gateway

3.56    Railway Road is the major southern gateway into the city centre; a key connection that leads to the very core of the city centre.

3.57    However, at the point where Railway Road reaches Eastbourne Street, traffic is directed to either turn left or right at traffic lights, with the large Southern car park directly ahead.  Pedestrians can cross but have to find their way past the car park to access a footpath leading north to the Central Plaza and other parts of Heretaunga Street.

3.58    Project 4 relates to the improvement of this area to create a more welcoming first impression.  Enhancements include:

·        Redesign intersection to allow vehicles to continue straight ahead into the Southern car park

·        Wider footpath, plantings and seating along the railway corridor to invite people to spend time in the area

·        Extend Eastbourne Street upgrade over the railway line, with continuation of feature lighting, banners, rata trees and paved footpaths.

 

Project 5: Civic Square

3.59    Civic Square is a vitally important part of the cultural and historical character and identity of both Hastings city centre and the wider district. Council’s vision for Civic Square is: “A place where our people will gather to engage with our arts, to embrace our culture and to celebrate our proud heritage.”

3.60    The location of Civic Square, adjacent to the main retail and hospitality areas, makes it a prominent and unique open space within the city centre. Its development and enhancement can see it become the district’s cultural focal point.

3.61    The size and importance of Civic Square requires the preparation of a dedicated plan, however this Plan also contributes some recommendations.

3.62    The key physical elements of a redevelopment aimed at making Civic Square a vibrant central civic space that is a destination in itself would include:

·        Enhanced and legible entrances to the art gallery and library and the development of a stronger identity for the park as the focus of the arts precinct

·        Improved landscaping and connections, with sheltered walkways and interactive water features

·        A more prominent setting for the cenotaph

·        New playground and youth spaces

·        Suitable and efficient car parking that does not detract from pedestrian amenity

·        The potential for the establishment of an iconic café

·        Spaces that can be used for a wide range of activities and events

·        Improved accessibility from the rest of the city centre with a strong gateway at the point where Karamu Rd intersects with Civic Square

Project 6: Karamu Road Precinct and Entrance Gateway

3.63    Karamu Road is the major northern gateway corridor into the city centre.  It is the key connection to the city’s commercial areas, the hospitality and entertainment precinct, and the Civic Square Library and Art Gallery precinct. This road also follows the historic route along which Hastings was established.

3.64    For these reasons it is proposed that improvements be made to the streetscape of Karamu Road to provide a clear visual and physical signal that this is a main gateway into the city centre.

3.65    Recommended works identified in the concept plans include the continuation of the planting of rata trees along the stretch, new footpath treatments, and the installation of feature lighting and banners.

3.66    A more comprehensive redevelopment programme is proposed for the northern section of Karamu Road, between Heretaunga Street and Eastbourne Street.

3.67    This block provides the connection between Hastings’ main street and Civic Square. It is proposed that pedestrians be given much greater priority in this precinct, in part achieved by narrowing the roadway to slow vehicles. Using special paving in the carriageway would indicate that the road was a shared space, encouraging pedestrians to cross and motorists to slow down.

3.68    The removal of the car parks on the southern side of the road would provide room for a much wider footpath on the sunny side of the street.

3.69    It would become an inviting public space to enjoy between Heretaunga St and Civic Square. Banners and special lighting would provide further vitality and could be used to announce specific events in the art gallery, the library or elsewhere in Civic Square.

3.70    There is also the opportunity (to be aligned with Project 5) to make Hastings City Art Gallery the main focal point of this gateway view, with the installation of large art piece visible from a distance and lit at night.

3.71    It is also suggested that the cultural and historic significance of Karamu Rd be made visible and celebrated using street art, stylised paving and/or other streetscape elements to provide symbolism and interpretation.

Project 7: Pocket Parks

Landmarks Square Extension

3.72    Landmarks Square is a popular and attractive public space in the city centre due to its favourable orientation and location just off Heretaunga Street East. Visitors, shoppers and workers use it as a space to meet people, eat their lunch, or rest.

3.73    Building on its success, it is proposed that this public space be extended over the adjacent Council car park.

3.74    Public consultation has indicated a need for more landscaped public areas in the city centre with children’s play places and public toilets. The expansion of Landmarks Square is considered an excellent opportunity to add to the city centre’s green space.

3.75    An area of raised lawn with edges to sit on is proposed for the Warren Street boundary. This lawn would provide an area to sit, lie or play on. It would also form a buffer between a proposed children’s play area and the street. The lawn would feature a sculpture over fall-safe paving that could be played on by children of various ages. It is envisaged that it would be photogenic – encouraging residents and visitors to take their photos in front of it.

3.76    The planting of trees and low vegetation to the rear of the space would deter antisocial behaviour while not limiting passive surveillance from the street. The planting would also filter the view of the car park behind. There would be a direct pedestrian connection between the extended pocket park and the car park.

3.77    The southern part of the space could be used for outdoor dining, adding further vibrancy to the area.  Officers have been in contact with the owner of Fun Buns who has indicated his desire to lease a portion of this space to provide outdoor seating to complement his restaurant.  This would assist in the vibrancy of the area after hours.

3.78    A set of public toilets is recommended at the northern end, to be designed and placed in a way that is not too intrusive, while allowing good visibility for security purposes.

King Street North Pocket Park

3.79    The western part of the city centre beyond the Central Plaza is considered to be short on public space, other than the footpaths and kerb build-outs along the street.

3.80    The Council-owned carpark on King St North behind Café Sutto offers an opportunity for conversion into a pocket park with outdoor dining space.

3.81    It is recommended in the concept plan that this area feature trees and lawn, providing much-needed ‘softening’ in this part of the city centre, while seating would invite people to pause in the shade on a hot day.

3.82    This development ties in with the proposal for additional pedestrian laneways, connecting streets with public car parks (refer to Project 8. Laneway and Accessibility Corridors). A system of such laneways is proposed for this block.

Albert Square

3.83    Albert Square is leased by Council to provide the community with an area of green space in the city centre.

3.84    Given it is not in Council ownership, investment in fixed infrastructure to date has been minimal. It is limited to a large chess set, a storage shipping container, and four bench seats and fruit trees planted around the street edge. Adjoining shipping containers are provided to the Hastings City Business Association, one of which can transform into a covered stage when the side door is pulled down.

3.85    Given the optimal location of this site relative to local cafes and restaurants, the library, the art gallery and the bus stop, it is proposed that the space be further developed on the basis that any infrastructure could be relocated if necessary.

3.86    The redevelopment of this space would be particularly focused on youth, who are currently not well catered for in the heart of the city centre. The relatively large size of Albert Square and its good visibility make it ideally suited to this.

3.87    As identified by the Youth Council, sustainability is a key consideration. This site provides the optimal location to introduce solar powered phone charging stations with Wi-Fi, which could be artistic as well as functional, providing seating and shelter.

3.88    Additional activities could be added to the site, such as a covered table tennis or swing-ball adjacent to the chess set, with seating and a shade sail.

3.89    To complement the existing fruit trees, raised gardens planted with herbs and vegetables could be installed along the car park boundary, watered using the existing irrigation on the site.

3.90    Such facilities and activities would encourage the use of this space by young people after school hours, with the added benefit of attracting families in the evenings and weekends and office workers during lunch breaks.  It is hoped that such activation and use would attract the establishment of complementary businesses and food outlets.

Project 8: Laneways and Accessibility Connections

3.91    The City Centre Strategy 2013-2033 identifies the need to develop cross-block pedestrian connections through the city centre, linking off-street public car parks with shopping areas. To achieve this, the strategy identifies that Council should acquire strategic sites as opportunities arise. 

3.92    The provision of pedestrian connections between off-street parking areas and the retail and entertainment attractors of Heretaunga Street improves the accessibility and permeability of the city centre. By providing more people with easier access to more car parks, the laneways also mitigate the removal of some street car parks for vibrancy initiatives.

3.93    The recent development of the 300 West Laneway has successfully provided an attractive mid-block direct pedestrian access from Heretaunga St West to an existing off-street public car park. The retention of the historic building façade has meant the character of the streetscape has been preserved.

3.94     The recent strategic purchase of buildings in the 200 West block presents the opportunity to further develop this initiative by providing a laneway link to a new off-street public carpark planned for the block bounded by Heretaunga Street, King Street, Queen Street, and Market Street. The proposed King Street pocket park (Project 7b) would be connected to this network. It is envisaged that the laneway would be of a style and design that complements the 300 block laneway but may also provide an opportunity for a more sustainable design such as ‘living walls’.

3.95    As with Heretaunga Street West, the east blocks are characterised by a continuous built edge, meaning that any new pedestrian links to public off-street car parks will need to go through and be integrated within existing buildings. 

3.96    There are a number of public and private initiatives being considered and worked on that should be supported to provide laneways and pedestrian corridors within the Heretaunga St East blocks to link with parking facilities, pocket parks, and Civic Square.

Project 9: Street Upgrades

3.97    Project 9 relates to street refurbishment work identified in the Hastings City Centre Street Upgrade Programme that was updated in December 2018.  This work is funded substantially (80 per cent) by a targeted rate on properties within the city centre, amounting to $300,000 per year.

3.98    The work carried out typically includes footpath renewal and the installation of amenity street lighting, trees and street furniture, with the design informed by that of the already completed streets. 

3.99    The programme identifies the priority of central city streets to be upgraded, with the order in the newly adopted programme as follows: 1) Eastbourne Street; (2) Karamu Road; (3) King Street; and (4) Market Street.  Concept plans are included for each of these streets, consistent with the programme, including feature lighting, trees and street furniture.

Hastings Street Upgrade

3.100  Also included in this block of work is Hastings Street, between Heretaunga and Eastbourne Street.   

3.101  The proposals set out here are designed to celebrate the Hawkes Bay Opera House, a much-loved and newly renovated building by providing a grand threshold reflective of the building’s size and scale, and its importance to the central city and wider district.

3.102  This section of the street already features a relatively high-quality streetscape, with pavers along the footpaths, stone insets in bands across the carriageway, street trees, modern streetlights with flag banners, and kerb build-outs at either end.

3.103  In order to better cater for activities and events in and around the Hawke’s Bay Opera House involving large groups of people, it is proposed that the western footpath be extended into the parking zone, almost doubling its width.

3.104  A mountable kerb could be used to allow vehicles to, in special circumstances, pull up in front of the entrance to drop off and pick up people without blocking the carriageway.

3.105  This treatment would provide a grand entrance to the Opera House, and give visitors to that building and the adjoining Plaza and Municipal Buildings a place to gather and socialise before and after events.

3.106  Removable bollards along the kerb edge would enable the parking of service vehicles, buses or cars when required.

3.107  A number of other initiatives would further enhance what is, culturally and historically, a critically important sector of the city and the wider district, including the installation of two commissioned gateway art pieces to be located in the centre of the roundabouts to either end of this section of street.  These should be of significant scale and lit at night.

3.108  The replacement of the tired olive trees with rata trees would complement the planting of rata that is planned for Eastbourne St.

3.109  During the design and planning process for this section of Hastings Street, much consideration has been given to permanently closing it to vehicular traffic.  Traffic analysis has identified that this would have unacceptable consequences for other parts of the city centre, given the role Hastings St plays for north-south traffic.

3.110  It is also considered to be a disruptive measure that would be capitalised on relatively infrequently. Instead of permanently closing this portion of street, it is recommended to allow for temporary closures when events in the Opera House necessitate this. The two roundabouts at either end allow for easy turning, which means temporary closures can be easily accommodated from a traffic management perspective.

4.0       OPTIONS

4.1       There are three options available to Council:

Option 1:          Adopt the Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan

Option 2:          Adopt the Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan, with proposed amendments following the workshop

Option 3:          Do not adopt the Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan

5.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

5.1       The adoption of the Revitalisation Plan will not trigger any of Council’s significance thresholds.

5.2       Public consultation, and consideration of submissions during both the preparation of the City Centre Strategy 2013-33 and Long Term Plan 2018-28 has enabled Council to take into account the view and preferences of the community in the preparation of this Revitalisation Plan.

5.3       The majority of identified projects are currently included within the Council forward programme of works.  Consideration can be given to the allocation of funds to complete those three unprogrammed capital works projects as part of future Annual Plan and Long Term Plan reviews (2021 onwards).   

5.4       Council can be satisfied that the proposals included in this Revitalisation Plan are consistent with the wider views of the community.

5.5       In addition, the designs contained in the Plan are conceptual and not final.  Targeted consultation with affected parties will be undertaken before individual projects progress.  That consultation will influence the detail of the design elements included.   It should also be noted, that unique design elements, such as art pieces, are also yet to be determined, and that such designs need to be feasible and affordable, which will influence the ultimate appearance and materiality of each project.

5.6       It is recommended that the important stories about our identity be integrated into the city centre fabric.  These stories, old and new, can be demonstrated through literal and abstract forms throughout the city centre, such as artworks, interpretation boards, native plantings, design elements and infrastructure.

5.7       Council has recently endorsed the Arts & Culture Strategic Framework, in particular the agenda for building and expressing our Regional Identity through Place Based Design. This framework will include the preparation of an Urban Design Guide for use by developers, architects, landscape architects, urban designers, artists, mana whenua and anyone else who may seek to give expression to the regional identity.  

5.8       It is recommended that a Working Group be established to assist with design features and implementation of individual projects contained within this Revitalisation Plan consistent with the framework and design guide.  This group could include representation from: Council, Landmarks Trust, Mana Whenua, Arts & Culture Sector, Hastings City Business Association, and Youth Council.

6.0       ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS (INCLUDING FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS)

Adopt the Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan

6.1       Adopting the Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan will allow Officers to commence the detailed design and construction of the proposed projects identified.   The projects included in the Revitalisation Plan are consistent with the intent of the City Centre Strategy 2013-33 and in accordance goals, actions and budget included in the Long Term Plan 2018-28.  

6.2       As identified in Attachment 1, the Long Term Plan includes a total of $5,380,000 split over four years allocated to City Centre initiatives.  In addition, there is a total of $3,500,000 over the next eight years allocated towards the CBD Street Upgrade Programme, giving a total available budget of $8,880,000.

6.3       20 of the 23 projects identified in Table 1 can be funded within existing available budgets.  These have been programmed within an achievable and practical timeframe, with the aim to focus on the east block hospitality areas, to complement existing developer investment in this area, and work on the Opera House.

6.4       Funding for the three projects with no existing funding stream may be considered as part of other project budgets, or as part of future Annual or Long Term Plan considerations.  

6.5       Officers are mindful of current financial commitments therefore the recommended programme is achievable without a requirement for additional funding.  

6.6       Adopting the Revitalisation Plan will enable Officers to commence those Stage 1 Priority Projects identified for implementation in the next two years, with the aim of completing those projects in the East Blocks to coincide with the opening of the Opera House towards the end of 2019.  The proposed Implementation Plan is identified in Attachment 2.

7.0       PREFERRED OPTION/S AND REASONS

7.1       Option A is preferred.

7.2       The city centre includes a network of pubic open spaces: parks, the Central Plaza, streets, pedestrian links, laneways and footpaths, all providing space for people to relax, engage and be entertained.

7.3       Many of these spaces are currently underused with limited facilities and amenity. In many cases they are used simply as thoroughfares and their design, location and quality contribute little to the vibrancy of the city. These spaces should be the focal point for community social interaction, and their development provides Council with the opportunity to enhance visitor experience; encouraging people to visit, stay longer, and return.

7.4       The Revitalisation Plan identifies priority development sites where Council will focus investment over the next five years to complement developer and business investment. It aligns with the City Centre Strategy and the LTP.

7.5       The projects specifically relate to the provision and enhancement of attractive and inviting public spaces in the city centre. Together with a number of other Council initiatives, these projects will contribute to further positive improvement in the vibrancy of the city.

7.6       The purpose of the Plan is to assist with the improvement of the performance of the city centre through urban design initiatives, thereby creating a distinctive city centre that attracts people.

7.7       The majority of identified projects are currently included within the Council forward programme of works.  Consideration can be given to the allocation of funds to complete those three unprogrammed capital works projects as part of future Annual Plan and Long Term Plan reviews (2021 onwards).   

8.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)      That the report of the Parks Planning and Development Manager titled Presentation of Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan dated 26/02/2019 be received.

B)     That the Community Development Committee adopt the Hastings City Centre Public Spaces Revitalisation Plan.

C)     That the Community Development Committee endorse the priority programme identified in Attachment 2 and instruct Officers to proceed to detailed design and further consultation to implement Stage 1 works.

With the reasons for this decision being that the objective of the decision will contribute to meeting the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost-effective for households and business by:

            Giving effect to the goals and objectives included in the Hastings City Centre Strategy 2013-33 and Long Term Plan 2018-28 to improve the vibrancy and amenity of the Hastings City Centre.

 

 

 

Attachments:

 

1

Proposed City Centre Revitalisation Budget and Action Plan

CG-14-73-00045

 

2

Implementation Plan

STR-22-8-19-707

 

 

 

 


Proposed City Centre Revitalisation Budget and Action Plan

Attachment 1

 

PDF Creator


Implementation Plan

Attachment 2

 

PDF Creator


File Ref: 18/1295

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Project Manager - Strategic

Sam Faulknor

SUBJECT:                    Residential Development Status Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update the Council on progress made to help enable new residential land to be brought to the market for development.

 

1.2       This report seeks to highlight current growth areas, the number of potential housing units, quarterly statistics within these identified growth areas, the estimated timeframes to bring each area to the market, and the importance of applying a strategic managed approach.

 

1.3       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

 

1.4       This report concludes by recommending that the report be received.

 

2.0       BACKGROUND

 

2.1       The Heretaunga Plains Urban Development Strategy (HPUDS) 2010 was established to plan and allow for residential and industrial growth in Hawke’s Bay. This strategy is a collaborative approach by the Hastings District Council, Napier City Council and Hawke's Bay Regional Council towards managing urban growth on the plains from 2015 to 2045.

 

2.2       Additionally, the 2016 National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity (NPSUDC) requires local authorities to monitor and report on residential market indicators. The 2018 quarter three monitoring report is available and has been added as an appendix document to this report.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

Market summary

3.1       Land availability and Greenfield developments are steadily increasing largely due to developments in:

·    Arataki – 27 lot subdivision off Meissner Road.

·    Arataki – 39 lot subdivision in the old camping ground site.

·    Northwood – 30 lot subdivision constructed.

·    Northwood - ~25 lot subdivision planned construction in 2019

·    Lyndhurst Stage 2 – 104 lot subdivision application granted.

This gives a total of 225 lots created or about to be created over a ~18-24 month period.

3.2       As an indication of historical demand, since the year 2000 the average land uptake for Greenfields has averaged 99 lots per year with a peak in 2005 of 165 lots. There hasn’t been a year that has broken 100 since 2010, although land was a constraint around 2015 - 2018. Forward projections for the next 10 years are based on an average of 140 lots per year. In 2018 there was an uptake rate of 118 Greenfield lots.

3.3       With planned development in Iona and Howard Street (660 dwellings) close to resolution significant further land should be available to meet demand. This suggests that supply and demand should be in balance provided developers are prepared to develop, in line with market demand.

 

            Dwelling Consent by Location

 

3.4       Over a six year period there has been a steady increase in the number of new dwellings consented. The fourth quarter of 2018 shows an increase in the number of dwelling consents in the district compared to previous quarters. This is due to increases in rural, infill and development in Lyndhurst.

3.5       New dwelling consents received in 2018 were the highest level in 10 years at 302, with development equalling 2007 building peak levels.

Dwelling Consent by Type

3.6       The above graph, Quarterly Dwelling Consents by Type Last 6 Years, shows an increase in the fourth quarter rural and infill dwellings compared with previous years.

Residential – Greenfield Activity Summary

3.7       An application for 39 lots has been received and granted, for the former proposed school site, in Arataki. Construction has begun and the remaining stage are expected to be completed within 2019.

Table 1. Greenfield Activity

31-Dec-2018

Unbuilt Lot Capacity

New Lots Created this Quarter

 Building Consents Granted (ex lifestyle village)

Balance lots

Lots yet to be Created

Total Remaining Capacity

Area

Flaxmere*

59

0

0

59

~111

~170

Arataki

17

5

1

21

30

51

Lyndhurst Stage 1

4

1

1

4

12

16

Lyndhurst Lifestyle Village

8

0

8

0

0

0

Lyndhurst Stage 2

38

0

10

28

255

283

Northwood

4

0

0

4

77

81

Howard Street

0

0

0

0

260

260

Iona

0

0

0

0

400

400

Total Zoned and or Subject to Appeals

130

6

12

116

1145

1261

*Note: Part of Flaxmere is subject to resubdivision by the landowner.

3.8       While limited capacity remains in Arataki (albeit the newly augmented release of the school site back into development land supply) and Lyndhurst Stage 1, the Northwood residential area on the north eastern fringe of Hastings has approximately 4.5 hectares of land left to develop for housing with potential for ~80 lots.

3.9       The main developer of the Northwood subdivision has completed earthworks for 30 of these residential lots within stage 8B and anticipates titles in 2019.

3.10    Indications from the building industry show a buoyant Hawke’s Bay market where there is still a steady demand for residential properties. Developers have indicated they have waiting lists of buyers interested in sections in Hastings and Havelock North.

3.11    There has been no material change in the market trends since the last report to the Community Development Committee in September 2018.

4.0       RESIDENTIAL GROWTH AREA STATUS UPDATE

4.1       The following section of this report provides a brief update on progress being made on new growth areas.

4.2       The future residential areas identified and prioritised for future growth are; Lyndhurst Stage 2, Howard Street and Iona. The estimated potential residential yield from these subdivisions is ~900 lots.

4.3       There is also interest in the release of the wider Brookvale area (which was not in HPUDS 2010 but was recommended in HPUDS 2016). Provided it proves to be feasible, this area could substitute for the originally planned Arataki Extension.

Lyndhurst Stage 2

4.4       Both the easement corridor negotiations and the services installations along Lyndhurst Road are completed.

4.5       An application from a landowner for 104 residential lots has been granted. Titles are expected in early 2019 for stage 9 works. Within this area the HDC service corridor is located which will link up services between Lyndhurst Road and Arbuckle Road. Construction of this portion of services will be completed early 2019.

4.6       A number of additional landowners within the Lyndhurst development area have also signalled their intentions to develop, in the short term, and officers are in active dialogue about future developments.

Howard Street

4.7       The Council’s stormwater solution for servicing this area has been appealed to the Environment Court. Council have mediated an agreement with the appeal party and this agreement is with the Environment Court for its approval.

4.8       The development process can begin once the consent order is received from the Court and, for properties reliant on the internal road, once the designation is confirmed.

4.9       The Council has notified its Notice of Requirement for the designation of the internal road and a stormwater overland flow path. Submissions have been received and will be heard by an independent commissioner on 19th February 2019.

Iona

4.10    The Iona area has been brought forward for development to account for the removal of the Arataki extension in the short term.

4.11    The date from which the rezoning takes effect and the Proposed District Plan provisions became operative was 19 September 2018.

4.12    Council is in discussion with the main landowner within the Iona development area and is working through the development process. There is a high development interest in Breadalbane Avenue, which forms part of the Iona development area. The design of Breadalbane Avenue is underway and the physical upgrade of the road is expected to be completed in early-mid 2020.

Brookvale

4.13    The Brookvale Area has been identified as part of the 2016 HPUDS Review as a growth area to substitute for the loss of the Arataki Extension area originally proposed in HPUDS and to cater for a more positive outlook in HPUDS 2017. The Brookvale Area has potential for development in the short to medium term.

4.14    There is developer interest in the Brookvale area, with a resource consent application having been lodged. Officers are in dialogue with potential developers.

4.15    Council has scheduled a commencement of this area in the Long Term Plan (LTP) to follow the completion of the Iona block.

4.16    Development within part or all of the Brookvale/ Romanes area could nevertheless eventuate sooner than anticipated by Council by way of a non-complying resource consent, or appeal consent order.

Flaxmere

4.17    In addition to the future growth areas outlined in this report, there is high interest in the future use and development of land in West Flaxmere.

4.18    Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga (TTOH) is in the process of launching its 130 home development ‘Waingakau Suburb’. This suburb borders rural land in Flaxmere west. This development will be a mix of co-housing and conventional housing. An application for 12 dwellings for stage 1 has been submitted.

4.19    Additionally, officers are currently investigating development options for two separate parcels of land in West Flaxmere.

Growth Planning

4.20    Table 2 below summaries the expected yield and timings for further growth planning for these areas.

Table 2. Future Greenfield Areas and Estimated Yield

 

 

Area

Estimated Unbuilt Lot Capacity

Estimated  Subdivision Commencement

Flaxmere

~170

Stage 1 – early 2019

Lyndhurst Stage 2 (lodged)

Lyndhurst Stage 2 balance

104

153

Consent Issued

*2019/2020

Howard

~260

tbc**

Iona

~400

tbc

Brookvale (including Romanes)

~575

tbc

Total

~1662

 

*Note: Timing is dependent on landowner timeframes.

**Note: Timing is dependent on appeals process.

The estimated subdivision commencement indicates when the landowner may begin physical works such as earthworks and transportation of soil.

5.0       MEDIUM DENSITY HOUSING – STATUS UPDATE

5.1       The Hastings District Plan identifies City Living Zones as areas to accommodate medium density housing at densities of more than 250m2 and less than 350m2 gross area of land per unit.

5.2       The purpose of the City Living Zone is to encourage for a more compact form of residential development.

5.3       These zoned areas are located in close proximity to Mahora shopping centre, Cornwall Park, and around local shops on Heretaunga Street East and the open space of Queen’s Square.

5.4       A Medium Density Strategy to encourage more compact housing developments was adopted by Council in November 2017 and implementation is now in the planning stage.

6.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

6.1       This report does not trigger Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and no consultation is required.

 

7.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)      That the report of the Project Manager - Strategic titled Residential Development Status Update dated 26/02/2019 be received.

With the reasons for this decision being that enabling the supply of Greenfield residential sections to meet current and future market demand contributes to meeting the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure and local public services by applying robust project and program management processes. 

 

Attachments:

 

1

NPSUDC Q3 Monitoring Report

STR-4-2-18-890

 

 

 

 


NPSUDC Q3 Monitoring Report

Attachment 1

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


File Ref: 19/54

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Project Manager

Jennifer Bainbridge

SUBJECT:                    Industrial Development Status Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update the Council on progress made to help open new land for industrial development.

1.2       This report seeks to highlight current growth areas, new development activity within the Irongate and Omahu Industrial zones and the importance of applying a strategic managed approach.

1.3       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 1- of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost-effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient, effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       This report concludes by recommending that the report be received.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       The Heretaunga Plains Urban Development Strategy (HPUDS) 2010 was established to plan and allow for residential and industrial growth in Hawkes Bay. This strategy is a collaborative approach by the Hastings District Council, Napier City Council and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council towards managing urban growth on the plains from 2015 to 2045.

3.0       STATUS UPDATE

Irongate Industrial Zone

Installation of Infrastructure

3.1       Physical works to install the main water and waste-water services for the Irongate Industrial Zone are complete.  Services along Irongate Road are now operative and available for connection.

3.2       The Irongate Road cul-de-sac works were completed before the 2017 Christmas shut down period and now provide access to the adjacent properties.

3.3       The next stage of Irongate Road East improvements has been put out to tender with works scheduled to begin in the autumn. The installation of the roundabout at Maraekakaho and Irongate roads is scheduled to commence in the 2019/2020 financial year.

Variation Process and Development Contributions (DC)

3.4       The general industrial zoning of this land has full effect. A settlement was reached on the Appeal to the Irongate Zone Variation. The parties signed the settlement and it was approved by the Court.

3.5       The 2018/19 DC Policy went into effect on 1st July 2018. The upfront payments and expected early uptake of the development brought the rate down significantly from $12.70/m2 to $8.45/m2.

3.6       Thus far DCs for almost a quarter of the land in the Irongate Industrial Zone have been paid. The landowners who paid early in the process helped enable Council to start the construction phase of the project. As development occurs more landowners will pay their DCs.

3.7       Under current development and subdivisions we expect a further 4+ Ha to pay prior to 30 June 2019.

 

Industrial Activity Market Trends

3.8       Landowners in the Irongate Industrial Zone have commenced development activities on several sites. Since the September 2018 Community Development meeting, one resource consent had issued with an additional application being assessed for properties in the Irongate Industrial zone. In the same period, two building consents issued for activity within the zone with a further two received for a business producing relocatable buildings within the zone.

3.9       There remains high demand for general industrial land, with interest in Irongate and Omahu Road anticipated to remain strong for the foreseeable future.  Enabling industrial development in the Irongate and Omahu Zones remains a top priority for Council. Council is investing significant effort into helping this happen.

Gateway to Irongate

3.8       Council officers are currently exploring the possibility of including a design feature in the Irongate/Maraekakaho Road roundabout that will serve as an entryway to the Irongate Industrial Zone.

           

            Omahu Industrial Zone

            Installation of Infrastructure

3.10    Physical works to install the main water and waste-water services for the Omahu (North) Industrial Zone are proceeding.

3.11    The contractor is currently finishing up Separable Portions 2, 3 and 4 of the physical works contract.

3.12    Design work has been completed for Separable Portion 5 with work scheduled to begin in the first quarter of 2019.

            Variation Process and Development Contributions (DC)

3.13    The general industrial zoning of this land now has full effect. 

3.14    The 2018/19 DC Policy went into effect on 1st July 2018. The upfront payments of DCs meant there was no significant increase in the rate. For the 2018/19 fiscal year it sits at $18.82/m2, up slightly from $18.47/m2.

3.15    Thus far DCs for just under half of the land in the Omahu Industrial Zone have been paid. The landowners who paid early in the process helped enable Council to start the construction phase of the project. As development occurs more landowners will pay their DCs. Under current development and subdivisions we expect a further 2+ Ha to pay prior to 30 June 2019.

 Stormwater Consent

3.16    Hawke’s Bay Regional Council approved Hastings District Council’s Storm Water Discharge Consent to allow stormwater to be disposed of throughout the Zone.

3.17    If landowners wish to construct, and subsequently discharge into the Storm Water Infiltration Basin, they will need to apply to Hastings District Council as the ‘requiring authority’. 

Industrial Activity Market Trends

3.18    Similar to section 3.5, there remains high demand for general industrial land. Since the September Community Development meeting, there has been one resource consent granted and one is being assessed for properties in the Omahu (North) zone. In the same period, four building consents have been granted with an additional one processing for the zone.

4.0       REGIONAL LAND STRATEGY

4.1       Officers from Hastings District Council and Napier City Council recently met to begin discussing a joint regional approach to industrial land strategy.

4.2       This initial meeting consisted of a tour of industrial sites in both districts to help build an understanding of existing and planned industrial areas as well as to encourage an open conversation around the opportunities and challenges around them.

4.3       Next steps include the formation of a joint working party that will initially identify key goals and benefits HDC and NCC hope to achieve through the regional approach.

5.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

This report does not trigger Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and no consultation is required.

 

6.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Project Manager titled Industrial Development Status Update dated 26/02/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/43

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries

Paula Murdoch

SUBJECT:                    Hastings District Libraries: Prison Programmes update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee about Better Lives: Hastings District Libraries’ engagement in the custodial and reintegration space, a programme which Libraries staff are running at the Hawke’s Bay Regional Correctional Facility (HBRCF) at Mangaroa.

1.2       This issue arises from Council’s commitment to addressing social disadvantage and its focus on the following key demographics:

·    Elderly

·    Young people

·    Māori

·    Vulnerable communities

1.3       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       The objective of this decision relevant to the purpose of Local Government is to deliver library services within the wider community, with a particular focus on supporting literacy as an essential life skill by assisting people (including youth) in education, skill development and employment; and assistance for people in need.

1.5       This report concludes by recommending that this report and the accompanying presentation by the Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries be accepted.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       Increased emphasis has been placed on delivery of library services outside the physical library space in recent years. A staffing reorganisation of Libraries in 2018 created a structure that aligned better with its Strategic Plan, 2016-2020 and also with Council goals in the priority areas listed above.

2.2       The result of this has been increased engagement with various community groups, organisations and agencies on a scale not possible previously. This has meant that the key demographics identified can be reached in greater measure and benefits from use of library services are being realised within parts of the community that have previously not been as well served.

2.3       The link between literacy and crime is well known, with 2016 research showing that 63% prisoners in New Zealand are unable to complete everyday literacy tasks such as reading tenancy agreements, employment contracts, or even a child’s school report. Low levels of literacy contribute to unemployment on release which in turn significantly increases the risk of reoffending.

2.4       In 2013 the Department of Corrections held an Open Day at the HBRCF at Mangaroa to seek partner agencies to work with on prisoner rehabilitation and reintegration. 

2.5       Libraries staff accepted the challenge and have worked with Corrections staff since then to support delivery of inhouse programmes and to offer support for those shortly reintegrating into the community, as well as their whānau.

2.6       Some whānau relocate to the Hawke’s Bay while their family member is serving their sentence and public library services can be part of an important support network – whether helping extended families stay in touch with each other through internet access; supporting employment seekers through computer and internet access; providing recreational opportunities for parents and their young ones through recreational reading, groups or library programmes; or assisting with community connection by simply providing a space in which they are welcome.

2.7       A particular area of focus has been promoting library services to the children and partners of prisoners, as well as working with prisoners as they approach their release date to promote services such as computer access and support (such as job seeking support CV development, literacy support, etc), relevant programmes and also to promote the libraries as a space in which they can feel welcome.

2.8       Up until about 2017, library staff were limited in terms of what they could do or provide onsite at Mangaroa – it was limited to a few visits to the Prison Library to promote public library services, but with little opportunity to deliver much else onsite as library staff had no direct contact with prisoners. While operating within the security constraints of the prison, the opportunities to promote services to the wider prison population - and therefore their families - were very limited.

2.9       A shift in philosophy within the Department of Corrections around that time means that there is now greater priority given to prisoner education (especially with regard to literacy) leading to increased opportunity for Libraries staff to work more directly with prisoners, regardless of their release status.

2.10    A Prison Book Club was started in 2017 which was facilitated by library staff and open to a broad range of inmates. It was the first step in a journey that continues today and which has evolved according to prisoners’ needs and interests over time.

2.11    It is noted here that very few public libraries in New Zealand work directly with their local correctional facilities. Christchurch and Whanganui Prisons have (or have had) arrangements with their local public libraries that generally relate to prisoners in self-care units, while a few other public libraries have provided withdrawn bookstock to a local facility, but there is no “standard” level of service between prisons and their local public libraries.

2.12    The work currently being undertaken by Hastings District Libraries at the HB Regional Correctional Facility is unique both in terms of its scale and its scope.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       A Book Club for inmates in 2017 provided an exciting opportunity to establish a regular presence inside the wire through a forum facilitated by library staff for prisoners to meet and discuss their reading. Library staff offered suggestions, support and general information about library services. Inmates were generally appreciative of the service and staff began to explore with Corrections staff ways that the sessions could grow according to prisoners’ needs and interests.

3.2       In the second half of 2018, library staff began running presentations that are tailored around services available to prisoners on release and to their family right now – including free membership; free internet access; free programmes for kids (eg. Storytimes, reading programmes, etc.).

3.3       For some long term inmates these may be of little immediate benefit, but benefits for their families do capture their interest. Many long term inmates want to ensure that their children can choose a different pathway in life from the one they have taken, and literacy and education is seen as key.

3.4       The services delivered at the HB Regional Correctional Facility show how library services are actively evolving to meet the different needs of a wide range of people within the community. They are also evidence of library staff taking services that support the development of literacy beyond the physical library facility, to meet different communities of interest in their own spaces.

3.5       The accompanying presentation outlines the programmes being delivered at the HBRCF and the reach into the prison community. Staff are no longer engaging only with inmates who are close to the end of their sentence, but from right across the facility, from self-care residents to those in the most secure units of the prison.

3.6       Finally, it should be noted that staff security is paramount and has been factored in to each visit. Council Health & Safety Plans have been developedw and updated as required. A diverse range of staff are now visiting the facility on a regular basis, having been vetted by the Department.

4.0       OPTIONS

4.1       There are no options presented as no decision is being sought.

5.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

5.1       There is no engagement required and this matter does not trigger Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

6.0       ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS (INCLUDING FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS)

6.1       No options are presented.

7.0       PREFERRED OPTION/S AND REASONS

7.1       There are no preferred options.

8.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report and presentation of the Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries titled Hastings District Libraries: Prison Programmes update dated 26/02/2019 be received.

With the reasons for this decision being that the objective of the decision will contribute to meeting the current and future needs of communities for good quality local public services in a way that is most cost-effective and beneficial for the community by:

i)          Assisting people (including youth) in education, skill development and employment; and

ii)         Assistance for people in need.

 

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/3

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Team Leader Community & Safety

Louise Stettner

SUBJECT:                    Multicultural Strategy - Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to obtain a decision from the Committee regarding community and stakeholder engagement with respect to the development of the Hastings Multicultural Strategy. 

1.2       This request arises from the development of the Hastings Multicultural Strategy and the preference for community and stakeholder engagement in this process.

The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.3       The objective of this decision relevant to the purpose of Local Government is it will contribute to meeting the current and future needs of communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and business by ensuring that the Hastings Multicultural Strategy reflects the needs and aspirations of the local community.

1.4       The Social and Cultural Committee were advised of Council’s plans to develop a Multicultural Strategy at the end of 2017.  This Committee also agreed that a Multicultural Strategy Working Group be formed to develop key aspects of the Strategy and that this Group should be comprised of community representatives and leaders.

1.5       The Multicultural Strategy Working Group that was formed in June 2018 has made good progress with the Strategy including identification of key goals and actions to be undertaken.  The Group which is comprised of Councillors and community members from a range of different backgrounds and ages consider that it is an appropriate time to engage with the community and stakeholders on the Strategy.  The intention is to seek community input prior to the Strategy being finalised.

1.6       This report concludes by recommending that the Committee agree to community and stakeholder engagement to take place in the first quarter of 2019.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       On 12 December 2017 the Social and Cultural Development Committee were informed that Hastings District Council will be developing a Multicultural Strategy.  This Committee agreed to the creation of a Multicultural Strategy Working Group comprised of local community leaders and representatives to develop key aspects of the Strategy. 

2.2       On 16 May 2018 Council’s International Advisory Group was advised of the intention to develop a Multicultural Strategy. Members from this group volunteered to be part of the Multicultural Strategy Working Group. 

2.3       The Multicultural Strategy Working Group was formed in June 2018; the Terms of Reference for this group is attached

2.4       The Group is made up of Councillors and community representatives from a range of different cultural backgrounds and ages.  Members of the Hawke’s Bay Multicultural Association and the Hastings Youth Council are part of this Working Group.  The members of the Working Group wish to thank the Hastings District Council for agreeing to undertake a Multicultural Strategy and are grateful for the opportunity.

2.5       Members of the Working Group include:

 

Name

Group Representing

Councillor Geraldine Travers

Hastings District Council

Councillor Kevin Watkins

Hastings District Council

Abigail Masengi

Hastings Youth Council (2018)

Amataga Iuli

Pasifika Health Promoter, Hawke’s Bay District Health Board & Hawke’s Bay Multicultural Association

Derek Teariki

Cook Island community 

Hena Dugh

Hastings Youth Council (2018)

Jenny Too

Chinese Association Hawke’s Bay & Hawke’s Bay Multicultural Association

Olive Tanielu

Pasifika Liaison Nurse, Hawke’s Bay District Health Board

Paola Stobart

Hastings District Council.  Cultural background includes: - Italian, Greek Cypriot, African (both South African and Zimbabwean)

Rizwaana Latiff

Hawke’s Bay Multicultural Association, Zonta and New Zealand Council of Women

Sally Russell

Hawke’s Bay Multicultural Association

 

2.6       Development of a Hastings Multicultural Strategy provides Council with an opportunity to lead the District in embracing and promoting the advantages of a diverse community.  The Council has expressed aspirations to ensure its services are accessible to all and that everyone is encouraged to participate in the district’s democratic processes. A Multicultural Strategy would assist Council in engaging with and supporting the various cultures that make up the Hastings community.   

2.7       The Hastings community is comprised of a number of different cultures.  Census 2013 identifies the following breakdown of ethnic groups in the district.  We are awaiting the release of the latest Census data.


Ethnic Groups in the Hastings District – Census 2013

Ethnic Group

% of Hastings District Population

European

75.2

Maori

24.4

Pacific People

6

Asian

4.3

Middle Eastern, Latin American, African

0.5%

 

2.8       Note: Where a person reported more than one ethnic group, they have been counted in each applicable group.  As a result percentages do not add up to 100.  Source Statistics NZ.

2.9       15.7% of people living in the Hastings District were born overseas.  For people born overseas, the most common birthplace was England.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       The development of the first Hastings Multicultural Strategy is progressing well.  The Working Group has agreed that the Strategy should be based on a Treaty of Waitangi Framework.  It has also agreed to the strategic outcomes and goals of the Strategy.  Currently the goals include:

·    Multiculturalism and diversity is celebrated in Hastings

·    Hastings is a welcoming, inclusive and safe place for all

·    All communities have equitable access to Council services and resources

·    All residents are able to participate in Council decision-making.

3.2       The Working Group has agreed to some proposed actions that contribute to the identified goals including: development of a cultural calendar highlighting key cultural events and celebrations in Hastings); development of and maintenance of a database of local cultural groups and a newsletter.

3.3       The Working Group considers that it would be an appropriate time to engage with the community on the Multicultural Strategy in order to obtain their views on what should be canvassed in the Strategy including suggested actions to be undertaken.  Early engagement would mean that views are obtained and reflected within the Strategy prior to being finalised.

3.4       Endorsement is being sought from this Committee to engage with the community and stakeholders regarding the development of the Hastings Multicultural Strategy during the first quarter of 2019.

3.5       The Working Group has identified the following stakeholders: the Hawke’s Bay Multicultural Association; Citizens Advice Bureau; EIT; Harcourts Hawke’s Bay Arts Festival; Education Link; Learning Hawke’s Bay; Police; Hawke’s Bay District Health Board; Health Hawke’s Bay; Hastings Business Association and large employers.

3.6       The Working Group wish to undertake community engagement with the migrant community; the ethnic community and with people of all ages and cultural backgrounds in Hastings.  Members of the Working Group will provide connections with local cultural groups; churches; schools and other contacts to assist with consultation.  Opportunities to consult at events such as the International Cultures Day will also be undertaken.    

3.7       The International Cultures Day is being held on Saturday 2nd March at Cornwall Park.

4.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

4.1       Engagement with the local community and stakeholders is proposed to ensure that the Hastings Multicultural Strategy reflects community needs and aspirations.

5.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Team Leader Community & Safety titled Multicultural Strategy - Update dated 26/02/2019 be received.

B)        That the Community Development Committee endorse that community and stakeholder consultation be undertaken with respect to the development of the Hastings Multicultural Strategy.

With the reasons for this decision being that the objective of the decision will contribute to meeting the current and future needs of communities for local public services in a way that is most cost-effective for households and business by ensuring that the Hastings Multicultural Strategy reflects the needs and aspirations of the Hastings community.

 

Attachments:

 

1

Multicultural Strategy Working Group - Terms of Reference

COP-10-1-19-333

 

 

 

 


Multicultural Strategy Working Group - Terms of Reference

Attachment 1

 

PDF Creator


File Ref: 19/55

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 26 February 2019

FROM:                           Team Leader Youth Development

Paddy Steffert

Social & Youth Development Manager

Dennise Elers

SUBJECT:                    Youth Employment Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee on Council’s Youth Employment approach.

1.2       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.3       The objectives of this decision relevant to the purpose of Local Government is the provision of good quality local public services which are efficient and cost effective for households and businesses.

1.4       This report concludes by recommending that the report be received and; that Officers investigate further funding bids to the Provincial Growth Fund to implement further youth employment initiatives in Hastings.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       Council’s approach to Youth Employment commenced in January 2017 through the Connector model.

2.2       Initially 1.5 Youth Connectors were employed and due to high demand this soon increased to 2.5 FTE’s within the first 6 months.

2.3       The Connector programme has quickly grown and with the injection of Government funding through He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) there are now 3 Youth Connectors; an Employer Connector and a Whanau Connector (contracted to Te Ikaroa Rangatahi Social Services).

2.4       Council has also been successful in securing two further contracts called Rangatahi ma kia eke.  This project aims to work with young people with a mental or physical health condition or a disability into project based work where they can develop employment skills, experience and on the job training.  The projects run for 26 weeks providing real work experience to assist young people into future sustainable employment.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       As at 20th February 2019 the total number of rangatahi engaged is 285.  This includes pre HPR, HPR and Rangatahi ma kia eke.

3.2       Of the 285, 165 have resulted in positive outcomes which includes; training and employment.

3.3       Of that 160 are in employment and 5 are in training. (14 of the 160 have been in employment for 6 months).

3.4       Of the remaining 120 rangatahi; 40 are actively seeking employment with the team and 80 are not currently actively engaged or the team have been unable to make contact with them. 

3.5       The Youth Connectors still endeavour to make monthly contact in case there is a change of circumstance; for instance a rangatahi will make contact again if they have left the region and have now returned. 

3.6       Through the Employer Connector 45 employers have been engaged and 17 have signed up to be a part of HPR.

3.7       The Whanau Connector is currently working with 5 rangatahi and their whanau.

3.8       A large number of rangatahi engaged with the team are not work-ready.  The Youth Connectors spend time working with the rangatahi to address any barriers to employment.  This can include; preparing a CV, interview skills, driver licencing, life skills numeracy and literacy and healthy lifestyle choices.

3.9       Rangatahi also disclose other potential barriers to employment which can include complex social issues.  More often than not the family dynamic is a key factor for rangatahi requiring more than just pastoral care.

3.10    If the rangatahi needs are outside of our teams capabilities then a referral is made to the Whanau Connector. (see attached Youth Employment Pathway).

3.11    The Youth Employment team have also developed a “Getting to Work” pre-employment programme.  The programme is an opportunity for the Youth Employment Team to see exactly where the rangatahi is at and what further support is required for them to be work ready.

3.12    The team has also formed strong relationships with other providers who are delivering pre-employment programmes through LIFT Social Enterprise and the BOUNCE programme and Aim to Inspire (A2I).  Both programmes are specific in their content but have a focus on resilience, self-esteem, confidence and goal setting.

3.13    Support from the Youth Futures Trust has also provided extra resource to support rangatahi into employment by providing funding for driver training and licences, work clothing and equipment and birth certificates.

HE POUTAMA RANGATAHI

3.14    Hastings District Council was successful in securing He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) funding through the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) to grow its Connector programme.  The funding has enabled the employment of 3 new positions (Youth Connector, Employer Connector and Whanau Connector) for the next 2 years.

3.15    The new positions commenced employment between September and November 2019.

3.16    The Youth and Employer Connector sit within the Youth Development Team and Council has a contract for service with Te Ikaroa Rangatahi Social Services to deliver the Whanau Connector position.  This position specialises in working with whanau and social services.

3.17    The HPR contract with MBIE outlines a “target cohort of 45 every six months”, which in working terms means the Youth Connectors engaging 45 new rangatahi. There is also a target of 15 new employers engaged for the Employer Connector.

3.18    The first quarterly (July – October) report to MBIE for HPR was submitted in October 2018 and is attached to this report as (Attachment 1.)

RANGTAHI MA KIA EKE – Young Generation Rise Up!

3.19    A second round of funding was secured to further this project from the Ministry of Social Development and a visit from the national offie team was held at the end of 2018.  There is national interest in the success of this project in Hastings.

3.20    Project partners include; Ministry of Social Development, Hastings District Council, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawkes Bay District Health Board and Te Puni Kokiri and it sits under the Regional Economic Development Strategy (Project 1000).

3.21    In the first project 26 young people were engaged and 21 completed the programme, 8 of which are now in fulltime work and 5 in fulltime study.

3.22    The second project provides funding for 15 rangatahi. To date Council have engaged with 18, 10 are in work placement and 4 are going through interviews.  Four rangatahi have left the programme since starting that includes 2 who the team helped get fulltime employment. One has moved away and one has resigned.

MANA IN MAHI – Strength in Work

3.23    Announced by the Government in August 2018 Mana in Mahi aims to work with young people aged 18 to 24 years who have spent six months or more on a benefit to improve opportunities for young people to enter into sustainable employment. 

3.24    The programme pays a wage subsidy to an employer who employs a young person on benefit and offers them an opportunity to undertake industry training qualifications, including an apprenticeship and supports them on the journey.

3.25    The primary focus is young people (18-24 years of age) in receipt of a main income support benefit for at least 6 months.

3.26    Council has been successful in securing a Mana in Mahi position with the Asset Management Group – Landfill, Refuse Transfer Stations and Recycling Depots.

3.27    The position will commence in late March with recruitment commencing shortly.

GOVERNMENT FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENTS

TE ARA MAHI

3.27    In February 2019, the Government announced that the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) will set aside $82.4 million in funding for regional employment, skills and capability. 

Projects and activities considered for funding include a:

·      focus on any aspect of the pathway to employment for people in the regions. This includes tailored support for people to become work-ready, gain and sustain employment; and to support those who are underemployed and could upskill.

·      focus on employers who may need support, coordination or connections, to employ local people into local jobs.

·      focus on any age group within the working age population. If your project/activity focuses solely on people aged 15-24, you could also consider the He Poutama Rangatahi programme, which is specifically for activities involving younger people.

·      target any regions except the Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch metropolitan areas.

3.28    It is envisaged that Employment Hubs maybe set up where a region feels there is a strong need for this to happen.

 

HE POUTAMA RANGATAHI (HPR)

3.29    Of the $82.4 million announcement an additional $13.2 million has been allocated to the HPR programme nationally.

4.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Team Leader Youth Development AND Manager Social & Youth Development titled Youth Employment Update dated 26/02/2019 be received.

B)        That Officers investigate further funding bids to the Provincial Growth Fund to implement further youth employment initiatives in Hastings.

 

 

Attachments:

 

1

He Poutama Rangatahi Quarterly Report to MBIE July October 2018

COP-09-8-18-53

 

2

Youth Employment Pathway

COP-09-8-18-10

 

 

 

 


He Poutama Rangatahi Quarterly Report to MBIE July October 2018

Attachment 1

 

PDF Creator


He Poutama Rangatahi Quarterly Report to MBIE July October 2018

Attachment 1

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Youth Employment Pathway

Attachment 2

 

PDF Creator

          


TRIM File No. CG-14-73-00048

 

 

 

HASTINGS DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

Community Development Committee MEETING

 

Tuesday, 26 February 2019

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

 

SECTION 48, LOCAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL INFORMATION AND MEETINGS ACT 1987

 

THAT the public now be excluded from the following part of the meeting, namely:

 

15.       Strategic Projects Team 2018/19 Work Programme Update

 

The general subject of the matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this Resolution in relation to the matter and the specific grounds under Section 48 (1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this Resolution is as follows:

 

 

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

 

 

REASON FOR PASSING THIS RESOLUTION IN RELATION TO EACH MATTER, AND

PARTICULAR INTERESTS PROTECTED

 

 

GROUND(S) UNDER SECTION 48(1) FOR THE PASSING OF EACH RESOLUTION

 

 

 

 

15.       Strategic Projects Team 2018/19 Work Programme Update

Section 7 (2) (b) (ii)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely to unreasonably prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

To protect third party commercial interests.

Section 48(1)(a)(i)

Where the Local Authority is named or specified in the First Schedule to this Act under Section 6 or 7 (except Section 7(2)(f)(i)) of this Act.