Description: COAT-ARM Hastings District Council

 

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East, Hastings

Phone:  (06) 871 5000

Fax:  (06) 871 5100

WWW.hastingsdc.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

Open

 

A G E N D A

 

 

Council MEETING

 

Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan Submissions

 

Meeting Date:

Tuesday, 12 March 2019

Time:

9.00am

Venue:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East

Hastings

 

Council Members

Chair: Mayor Hazlehurst

Councillors Barber, Dixon, Harvey, Heaps, Kerr, Lawson, Lyons, Nixon, O’Keefe, Poulain, Redstone, Schollum, Travers and Watkins

 

Officer Responsible

Chief Executive – Mr N Bickle

Council Secretary

Mrs  C Hunt (Extn 5634)

 


TRIM File No. CG-14-1-01187

 

 

HASTINGS DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

COUNCIL MEETING

 

Tuesday, 12 March 2019

 

VENUE:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East

Hastings

TIME:

9.00am

 

A G E N D A

 

 

1.         Prayer

2.         Apologies & Leave of Absence

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

Leave of Absence had previously been granted to Councillor Lyons

3.         Seal Register

4.         Conflict of Interest

Members need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a Member of the Council and any private or other external interest they might have.  This note is provided as a reminder to Members to scan the agenda and assess their own private interests and identify where they may have a pecuniary or other conflict of interest, or where there may be perceptions of conflict of interest. 

If a Member feels they do have a conflict of interest, they should publicly declare that at the start of the relevant item of business and withdraw from participating in the meeting.  If a Member thinks they may have a conflict of interest, they can seek advice from the General Counsel or the Democratic Support Manager (preferably before the meeting). 

It is noted that while Members can seek advice and discuss these matters, the final decision as to whether a conflict exists rests with the member.

5.         Confirmation of Minutes

Minutes of the Council Meeting held Tuesday 5 March 2019, including minutes while the public were excluded.

(Previously circulated)

6.         Consideration of Submissions on Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan                                                                                                                                 5

7.         Additional Business Items

8.         Extraordinary Business Items 

 

 

     


File Ref: 18/1271

 

 

REPORT TO:               Council

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 12 March 2019

FROM:                           Parks Planning and Development Manager

Rachel Stuart

SUBJECT:                    Consideration of Submissions on Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       The purpose of this report is to consider whether to adopt the Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan (the Plan), following the hearing of submissions received on the Plan and obtain an agreement to the remedies sought.  

1.2       This requirement comes from the obligation of the Hastings District Council, as an administering body under the Reserves Act 1977, to prepare Reserve Management Plans for the reserves under its management.

1.3       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       The objective of this decision relevant to the purpose of Local Government is the delivery of good quality local infrastructure that creates places and spaces for recreation and arts and culture for the benefit of the whole community.

1.5       This report concludes by recommending that Council adopt the recommendations on submissions heard and adopt the Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       As an administering body under the Reserves Act 1977, the Hastings District Council is required to prepare Reserve Management Plans for the reserves under its management.  The Plans identify issues, objectives and policies for the use, development, management and protection of the reserves within the District.  Further, they seek to balance the protection of the natural resources on them, against the recreational needs of the community.

2.2       The Reserves Act requires a set process to be followed in the preparation of a Reserve Management Plan.  Council has adopted the following process based on these requirements.  

 

a)      Notification of intention to prepare Reserve Management Plan

b)      Receive comments from public for inclusion in Draft Plan

c)      Prepare Draft Plan

d)      Workshop with Council to consider Draft Plan

e)      Council adopts Draft Plan for consultation purposes

f)       Public notification of Draft Plan (60 day submission process)

g)      Hearing of submissions and make any required amendments

h)      Adopt Final Reserve Management Plan

i)       Monitor and review Plan as required.

 

2.3       The preparation of this plan has involved substantial research and consultation with the community last year.  The process is currently up to Step (g) identified above.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       Cornwall Park covers a total area of 8.3365 hectares contained within two separate titles: (1) Lot 142 DP 1302 contained in Certificate of Title HB68/128 comprising 8.0937ha; and (2) Part Lot 2 Subdivision D Heretaunga Blk contained in Certificate of Title HB87/219 comprising 0.2428ha.

3.2       The Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan was prepared taking into account all the identified issues and opportunities raised during the initial consultation and from various research.

3.3       The proposed vision for Cornwall Park identified in the Plan is: ‘the protection, management and enhancement of the natural, cultural and historic character of Cornwall Park as the premier Recreation Park of the District’.

4.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

4.1       Extensive Consultation with the community on the Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan has been undertaken.

4.2       Public notice was given on 14 July 2018 under Section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 of Council’s intention to review the 2009 Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan, along with an invitation to send written comments and attend an Open Day at the Park on 29 July 2018.  A letter was also sent to all neighbouring residents within 400m of the park, inviting their comments, and a link to a Community User Survey was publicised in the letter, on the public notice and on the Council website and Facebook page.  The closing date for written submissions was 3 August 2018.       

4.3       The survey process generated over 130 responses.   In summary these responses requested the retention of all the existing facilities in the Park; with the following improvements:

·     Improved children’s playground

·     Improved quality of pathways and new pathways to Rose Garden and around Sports field

·      New improved toilet facilities

·      Improved quality of the duck pond and stream

·      Provision of a café 

4.4       Two workshops were held with Councillors on 7 August and 8 November 2018, with all feedback incorporated into the Draft Plan.   The Draft Plan was also presented to the Disability Reference Group on 7 November; Landmarks Advisory Group on 14 November and Rural Community Board on 3 December 2018.  

4.5       The Draft Plan was adopted by the Works and Services Committee for consultation purposes on 20 November 2018.  The Works and Services Committee has authority to exercise all Council’s powers in matters affecting reserves including the adoption of Draft Reserve Management Plans for consultation.

4.6       Public Notice was given under Section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 of the availability of the Draft Cornwall Park Management Plan for public feedback on 1 December 2018, with a closing date of submissions of 15 January 2019.  A Public Open Day was also held at the park on 8 December where officers were available with copies of the proposed plans, and to answer any questions.

5.0       ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS (INCLUDING FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS)

5.1       Reserve Management Plans contain policies which regulate how a reserve is managed and identify key actions required in the future development of them. As such they are fundamental planning tools to ensure that reserves are developed in a planned and coordinated manner to achieve the best environmental and economic outcome.   Without Reserve Management Plans, work undertaken can be in an ad hoc manner, without taking into account the key objectives of the public or budget and environmental considerations.  

5.2       As can be seen from Table 1, there is $1,545,000 included in Years 1-4 of the Long Term Plan 2018-28 (LTP) for Cornwall Park works, specifically allocated to playground, toilet and duck pond improvements.

 

2018-28 LONG TERM PLAN

Description

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

TOTAL

Playground Stage 1

$495,000

$495,000

 

 

 

 

Toilet

 

$170,000

 

 

 

 

Duck Pond and Stream

 

 

 

$385,000

 

 

TOTAL

$495,000

$665,000

 

$385,000

 

$1,545,000

Table 1: Existing Budget Cornwall Park


 

5.3       In addition to this, the proposed Concept Plan includes a further $1,330,000 of actions, as shown in Table 2 below that was adopted by Council on 20 November 2018 for inclusion in the public consultation process. 

 

PROPOSED UNBUDGETED ITEMS

Description

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

TOTAL

Grass Embankments

 

 

 

$20,000

 

 

Osmanthus Viewing

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

Pathway Lighting

 

 

 

$5,000

 

 

Tree Uplighting

 

 

 

 

$50,000

 

Playground Stage 2

 

$500,000

 

 

 

 

Event Seating

 

 

 

 

$10,000

 

Playground Shade

 

$100,000

 

 

 

 

Cricket Walkway

 

 

 

$100,000

 

 

Rose Garden Walkway

 

 

 

$40,000

 

 

Duck Pond Walkway

 

 

 

$65,000

 

 

Fountain Walkway

 

$90,000

 

 

 

 

Stream/Lake Viewing

 

 

 

 

$100,000

 

Aviary Enhancements

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

TOTAL

 

$690,000

 

$330,000

$310,000

$1,330,000

Table 2: Proposed Budget for Cornwall Park Concept Plan

 

5.4       In the adoption of the Draft Plan and Action Plan for public consultation, Council signalled that these new actions be considered for inclusion in Years 2-5 of the Long Term Plan.  Should Council adopt the above unbudgeted items, officers will make a submission to the 2019/20 Annual Plan for the proposed budget inclusions for Year 2, which will be considered against other Council priorities at that time.   

5.5       Analysis of the budget as a result of consideration of submissions made in this report, are provided in Section 8.0 of this report. Of the total actions totalling an estimated $2,875,000, an allocation of $1,545,000 to action this expenditure has already been included in the forward budget for the Parks Asset Team.  The additional funding of $1,330,000 will be subject to the LTP process. Adopting the Action Plan will indicate acceptance of this expenditure and work commitment, when being considered and weighed against other competing priorities.  


 

6.0       WHAT CHANGES ARE SOUGHT BY THE SUBMISSIONS

6.1       55 submissions have been received relating to the Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan from the following submitters:

 

1

David Renouf

30

Frances Martin

2

Grant Burney

31

Shanon Tait

3

Helen Curran

32

Nicola Marett

4

Jessica Franklin

33

Doug Honnor

5

Catherine Scott

34

Cornwall Park Playcentre

6

Elliot Pritchard

35

Tony McBride

7

Graeme Mill

36

Rebecca Hill

8

Alison Francis

37

Hana Ruth

9

Pam Ogilve

38

Alison McMinn

10

Powerco Limited

39

Friends of Cornwall Park

11

Ministry of Education

40

Hugh McBain

12

Barbara Mawson

41

Linda Bruce

13

Jude Henderson

42

Elizabeth Carr

14

Sally Coop

43

Jenny Epplett

15

Laura Hocquard

44

Nichola Dickinson

16

Wayne Taylor

45

James Dickinson

17

Susy Ratcliffe

46

Amy Hutchinson

18

Oliver Styles

47

Playcentre New Zealand

19

Annabel Beattie

48

Ashridge Road Playcentre

20

Emily Davenport

49

Amy Hopkinson-Styles

21

Connie Moroney

50

Peter McNab

22

Janka McBeth

51

Ruth Vincent

23

Pia Bradshaw

52

Heritage New Zealand

24

Helen Whittaker

53

G & S Renall

25

Hallie Barclay

54

Bruce and Val Noell

26

Angel Clarke

55

Patricia Reddy

27

John Ruth

56

Margaret McBride

28

Vicki Hope

57

Alice Corkran

29

Michelle Hutton

 

 

 

6.2       All submissions received are summarised by Submission Number and Remedy Number in Attachment 1, and included in full in Attachment 2.    

Submissions in Support

6.3       Submissions have been received in support of the whole Plan from the following submitters.  These submissions are noted and appreciated, and require no further analysis.

6.4       Alison Francis (Submission 8) supports the content and intention of the whole Plan, particularly how the different needs of the whole community have been considered.

6.5       Jessica Franklin (Submission 4) supports the whole Plan and proposed upgrades of the Park.

6.6       Sally Coop (Submission 2.7) supports the inclusion of toilets beside the children’s playground.    

6.7       Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) support the provision of new toilets in the vicinity of the new children’s playground.

 

Submissions requiring further analysis

6.8       Submissions have been received that require further analysis of the following sections of the Plan and have been grouped into the following 18 remedies:

 

REMEDY

SECTION

REQUEST

1

Part 1

Introduction and Background

2

Section 1.2

Organised Sport 

3

Section 1.3

Dogs  

4

Section 2.2

Buildings

5

Section 2.3

Fences and Walls

6

Section 2.4

Lighting

7

Section 2.5

Playground

8

Section 2.8

Signs

9

Section 2.9

Park Furniture

10

Section 2.10

Vehicle Parking

11

Section 2.12

Pathway Networks

12

Section 3.1

Trees and Gardens

13

Section 3.3

Water

14

Section 3.5

Plant and Animal Pests

15

Section 4.1

Culture and Heritage

16

Section 5.1

Maintenance

17

Section 5.3

Leases

18

Section 5.5

Network Utilities

19

Section 5.9

Reserve Boundaries

 

7.0       ANALYSIS

7.1       The following sections are the subject of submissions that require further analysis. 

REMEDY 1: INTRODUCTION SECTION

Submissions and Reasons

7.2       Hugh McBain (Submission 40) requests that the history section be updated to correctly refer to the Deed of Gift.

7.3       Linda Bruce (Submission 41) requests that the Goals and Actions be amended to refer to contemporary social and cultural wellbeing.

Analysis

History Section

7.4       The history section of the Plan was written by local historian Michael Fowler. The submission of Mr McBain was sent to Michael Fowler for comment who has been in contact with Mr McBain to discuss their different interpretations.    

7.5       It appears that both parties are technically correct, although there are some mysteries.  The Council Minute Book and the Recreation Reserve Act both state that the land was a gift from James Nelson Williams.  However, as stated by the submitter, at the opening of the park in 1905 the Mayor stated that it was not James Nelson William’s land to gift, but that his generosity made it happen.

7.6       Following discussions with Mr McBain and further research, Mr Fowler recommends amendments to Page 6, History of Cornwall Park, as identified in the recommendations in paragraph 7.9 below.  Mr McBain has confirmed he is happy with the proposed amendments.

Social and Cultural Wellbeing

7.7       Linda Bruce requests an amendment to the Goals and Actions section in relation to ‘Social and Cultural Values’ as follows:

Improve Contemporary Social and Cultural Wellbeing

Through innovative planning and design achieve a sympathetic balance of the retention of historic features and new developments guided by bi cultural philosophy and contemporary aesthetics to ensure public spaces reflect our diverse community and are relevant to the needs of today’s young and future generations.

7.8       Officers support the submission of Linda Bruce in that it recognises that improving contemporary social and cultural wellbeing places culture as the core objective and puts people at the centre of planning.  This will then ensure that ‘people needs’ particularly reflect how places look and feel, as well as how they function will also be taken into account in future planning.

Recommendation

7.9       That the submission of Hugh McBain (Submission 40) requesting that the history section be updated to correctly refer to the Deed of Gift be allowed in insofar as Page 6 ‘History of Cornwall Park’ be amended as follows:

James Nelson Williams (1837–1915) was one of the so-called “apostles” who in 1864 leased twelve smaller blocks within the 19,385 acre (7,844ha) Heretaunga Plains Block.  James purchased his two blocks in 1870, calling his new estate Frimley. As Hastings was not a government-planned town it relied on the generosity of private landowners to donate land for public uses, such as schools and recreation areas.   

In December 1898, it was announced in the Hastings Standard that J N Williams (1837-1915) had “presented the Borough with a public park” from recorded proceedings at a Hastings Borough Council meeting.

The Hastings Borough Council minutes record this in December 1898:

“That this Council of behalf of the residents of Hastings accent Mr J N Williams a hearty vote of thanks for his magnificent gift of a piece of land to the Borough for the purpose of a Park and recreation grounds”

However, in what appears to be pencil and in different handwriting, a sentence was later added to the above minute after “Mr J N Williams”: “as representing the transferring of the property”.

This likely explains the reason why Archdeacon Samuel Williams’s (1822-1907) daughters, Mrs Lucy Warren and Miss Lydia Williams, donated Cornwall Park to the people of Hastings in 1901 (Samuel was J N Williams brother-in-law) -  J N Williams did not own the land, but was “representing” his brother-in-law, Samuel, who it appears did not want any publicity.

Samuel worked closely with his brother-in-law J N Williams, whose name appears on legal documentation connected with Cornwall Park.

At the opening of Cornwall Park in November 1905, Hastings mayor, W Y Dennett, stated:

“The park was a family gift of the Williams’, and although Mr J N Williams did not personally give the land, it was through his instrumentality that it was given to the people of Hastings.”

On 21 December 1898, James – who was a Councillor – announced at a Hastings Borough Council meeting he was gifting 20 acres (8ha) of his Frimley Estate as a Public Park. The area fronted Tomoana Road, and the Ruahapia creek ran through the property. The land was accepted with a vote of thanks by the Council.

A deed covering the gift of the Park from James Nelson Williams to the Hastings Borough Council was drafted in March 1900, setting out the conditions attached to the plantings in the Park.  Thomas Horton, who owned a nursery in Pahiatua (and later Hastings), supplied trees and hedges free of charge for preliminary plantings at the Park. Most of them were deciduous and were planted around the boundary. 

7.10    That the submission of Linda Bruce (Submission 41) requesting that the Goals and Actions be amended to refer contemporary social and cultural wellbeing be allowed and the Plan be updated as follows:

Amend Part 2 Social & Cultural Values by adding the following new section identified below in red italics:

Improve Contemporary Social and Cultural Wellbeing

Through innovative planning and design achieve a sympathetic balance of the retention of historic features and new developments guided by bi cultural philosophy and contemporary aesthetics to ensure public spaces reflect our diverse community and are relevant to the needs of today’s young and future generations.

 


 

REMEDY 2: ORGANISED SPORT

Submissions and Reasons

7.11    Policy 1.2.7 relating to the creation of grass embankment areas is opposed by Pam Ogilve (Submission 9) and supported by Sally Coop (Submission 14).

7.12    Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) request that the cost to relocate the cricket nets be borne by the Cricket Club

Analysis

7.13    Policy 1.2.7 states as follows:

1.2.7     Create two grass embankment areas on the perimeter of the Cricket Green to provide enhanced spectator experience and viewing and seating opportunities.

7.14    This initiative was recommended for inclusion in the plan during the initial public consultation with the Cornwall Cricket Club.  The Club are preparing their own Master Plan, which seeks to strengthen the success of the club by hosting additional representative level games and providing a more enjoyable viewing experience to the public.

7.15    The provision of grass embankment areas around cricket grounds is common, providing a low sloped area for viewing.  It also serves to create a semi-enclosed atmosphere to the ground, and also provides gentle play slopes for children when cricket isn’t being played.

7.16    The slopes would be low, and would not obscure views or detract from the openness of the Park.   These embankments could also be created using some of the topsoil that is removed from the existing playground, when the premier playground is being constructed.

7.17    With regard to the relocation of the cricket nets, there is no allocation of Council funds towards this.  Policy 1.2.6 states that Council will allow for this relocation, but no funds have been allocated.

Recommendation

7.18    That the submission of Pam Ogilve (Submission 9) is disallowed and the submission of Sally Coop (Submission 14) is allowed, insofar as Policy 1.2.7 is retained in the Plan.

7.19    That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) be allowed insofar as there is no allocation of Council funds towards the relocation of the practice nets.

 

REMEDY 3: DOGS

Submissions and Reasons

7.20    Catherine Scott (Submission 5) and Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) states that dogs should be on leads at all times in Cornwall Park, and that current signage is not sufficient.  The Friends of Cornwall Park also state that the notices should advise that disturbance or harm to wildlife is an offence.


 

Analysis

7.21    Dog walking is a popular recreation activity in Cornwall Park due to its size and attractiveness, good pathway network and location in a residential area.  Dogs are permitted in the park, however Policy 1.3.2 states that they must be on a lead at all times and under control by the person walking them.

7.22    It is not proposed to introduce a dog off-lead area to Cornwall Park, given the presence of the premier sportsfield and playground, and wildlife and duck pond.  There is a dog off-lead area at the adjacent Duke Street Reserve.

7.23    It is recommended that signs be improved that convey this message to users of Cornwall Park. 

Recommendation

7.24    That the submission of Catherine Scott (Submission 5) and Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) be allowed insofar as Policy 1.3.2 that requires dogs to be on a lead at all times in Cornwall Park is retained in the Plan, and that improved signs be erected.

 

REMEDY 4: BUILDINGS

Submissions and Reasons

7.25    Laura Hocquard (Submission 15), Wayne Taylor (Submission 16), Helen Whittaker (Submission 24), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) support the continuation and proposed enhancement of the bird aviary, but request that the funding be allocated earlier as a priority.

7.26    The submission of Wayne Taylor (Submission 16) also requests that consideration be given to modifying the bird aviary to allow the public to walk through and interact with the birds.

7.27    The submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) requests that due to the uncertain future of bird aviaries, that money only be spent on the general maintenance of this feature.

7.28    The submission of Heritage New Zealand (Submission 52) requests that Policy 2.2.7 be amended to state that buildings may be removed if no longer required.

Analysis

Bird Aviary

7.29    The bird aviary in Cornwall Park is one of the few remaining free flying aviaries in a public park in New Zealand.  It is highly regarded and a popular feature with visitors to the park.  The health and wellbeing of the birds is the primary consideration in the ongoing provision and maintenance of the aviary.

7.30    Policy 2.2.8 states that:

2.2.8     Maintain and enhance the bird aviary so that all birds are kept in a good healthy state, within a secure clean environment that provides a suitable habitat and surroundings for the birds and is visually appealing to the public.

7.31    The Action Plan in Section 6.0 of the Plan identifies that this enhancement work will be undertaken as a medium priority, with Officers recommending that $75,000 be included in the Long Term Plan for the year 2022/23 budget.

7.32    There is a custodian who spends three hours per day, five days a week in the aviary, who is capable and dedicated to the health and wellbeing of the birds in the aviary.     As identified by a submitter there is no custodian tending to the birds over the weekend other than a visual check.  Increasing this level of service to include weekend work is discussed in Remedy 16.

7.33    The health of the cockatoo has been questioned in the submissions.  The contract with Recreational Services specifies the following:

·      The Contractor shall ensure bird welfare by physically checking birds to inspect for any injuries or sickness

·      The Contractor shall immediately upon discovery advise the Contract Representative and contact the designated veterinarian immediately if any bird health issues are observed.

7.34    While the current vet report identifies no concerns relating to the health or wellbeing of the cockatoo, Council has discussed with the custodian the possibility of increasing the size of their cage and providing more amenity and light for them.  These birds are recognised as being a favourite among the public and improvements will be made to their cage. 

7.35    Further, as identified in Policy 2.2.11, it may be that these birds are cared for the remainder of their natural lives in the bird aviary, but not replaced.  Council will continue to work with the custodian and local vets in making such determinations that are always first and foremost made with regard to the health and wellbeing of the birds.

7.36    The custodian has identified a number of items that would improve the amenity of the aviary, including improved plumbing, provision of nest boxes, replacement netting, landscaping improvements and bird baths.  The majority of these works will be carried out as part of general maintenance and renewal, and $10,000 capital budget available as part of the building improvements in 2019/20.   In addition, Officers will work with local volunteer groups such as the Menzshed, who may be able to assist with some of the building work.

7.37    With regard to the submission from Wayne Taylor requesting the ability for members of the public to walk through the aviary, this would require significant expenditure in the design and upgrade of the aviary, and the provision of a permanent staff member.   Such expenditure is not considered as part of this Plan, nor considered a priority at this stage.   The suggestion that would enable members of the public or school children to interact with the birds from an education perspective may however have merit, and this could potentially be considered through the provision of managed open days.  Additional funds of approximately $20,000 would however be required for the provision of security doors and additional staff if this was wished to be pursued.

 

General Buildings

7.38    Heritage New Zealand requests that Policy 2.2.7 be amended to state that where buildings are no longer well utilised, that they will only be considered for removal, so other factors can be taken into consideration. This is supported by Officers.

Recommendations

7.39    That the submissions of Laura Hocquard (Submission 15), Wayne Taylor (Submission 16), Helen Whittaker (Submission 24), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) requesting that the funding for minor bird aviary enhancements be allocated earlier as a priority be allowed in part insofar as improvements will commence next financial year.

7.40    That the submission of Wayne Taylor (Submission 16) requesting that consideration be given to allowing modifications to allow the public to walk through the aviary be disallowed in part insofar as Officers will consider the potential for open days to enhance the potential educational benefits of the aviary

7.41    That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) requesting that Council only allocate general maintenance to the bird aviary be disallowed ad the Plan intends that the aviary remains in the Park as a key feature that is extremely popular with the public.

7.42    That the submission of Heritage New Zealand (Submission 52) requesting the amendment of Policy 2.2.7 be allowed insofar as the Policy is amended as follows:

Amend Policy 2.2.7 by adding the following words shown in red italics:

2.2.7     Keep the use and condition of buildings on the Park under review to ensure they meet the needs of park users and the community and remain relevant to the Park.  Where buildings are no longer well utilised, an alternative compatible community use will be found, or the building may be removed.

 

REMEDY 5: FENCES AND WALLS

Submissions and Reasons

7.43    Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) request the reinstatement of the plaque to the Fitzroy Avenue gates.

7.44    Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) requests the retention of the historic walls and seats; and measures to keep vehicles out of the park.

Analysis

7.45    The main entrance to Cornwall Park used to be by the Rose Garden off Fitzroy Avenue, which is delineated by large pillars.  While the ornate gates were removed during the 1970s – 80s, Council still owns the original commemorative plaques that were attached to them.  

7.46    Policy 2.3.4 states that Council will reinstate the side panels with a commemorative plaque between the pillars at the Fitzroy Road entrance to the Park.   The submission of the Friends of Cornwall Park is therefore allowed, insofar as Policy 2.3.4 is retained in the Plan.    

7.47    The submission of Elizabeth Carr requests the retention of the historic walls and seats; and measures to keep vehicles out of the park.   Section 2.9.6 (Park Furniture) states as follows: ‘maintain the historic stone seats, walls and bridges within the Park’.   Given the submission, it is recommended that a new policy also be added to Section 2.3 of the Plan as follows:

2.3.6       Maintain and protect the historic stone walls and seats within the Park for future generations to enjoy

7.48    Elizabeth Carr also supports measures to keep unauthorised vehicles out of the Park.    This is ensures via the inclusion of Policy 2.2.3, which is recommend to remain in the Plan unchanged.  The submission is therefore supported.

Recommendations

7.49    That the submission of Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) requesting the reinstatement of the plaque be allowed insofar as this is stated in Policy 2.3.4.

7.50    That the submission of Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) requesting the retention of the historic walls and seats; and measures to keep vehicles out of the park be allowed insofar as a new Policy 2.3.6 be added to the Plan, and that Policy 2.3.2 be retained in the Plan to keep unauthorised vehicles out of the Park.

2.3.6       Maintain and protect the historic stone walls and seats within the Park for future generations to enjoy

 

REMEDY 6: SECTION 2.4 LIGHTING

Submissions and Reasons

7.51    Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 14) support the policy to provide additional lighting around the pathways, but do not support the provision of up lighting of key amenity features.

Analysis

7.52    Funds are currently allocated in the proposed budget (2022/23) for the uplighting of key amenity and historic features within the Park, including specimen trees and the Coronation Fountain.   This initiative is not supported by Bruce and Val Noell. 

7.53    Lighting of key features within the park will be purposefully kept as a distinct layer that highlights the heritage character of the feature being lit.  This is common practice, and can be carried out in a way that does not have any adverse impact on surrounding residential properties.  It is a way to highlight the identity and history of the park, create a sense of celebration, and promote some of the significant features within the Park.   Officers will work with lighting experts at the time to create a lighting strategy to ensure that the design responds to the requirements of the park’s various uses.

Recommendation

7.54    That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 14) supporting the policy to provide additional lighting around the pathways be allowed insofar as the policy is retained, and the submission stating their opposition to the provision of amenity lighting be disallowed insofar as this policy be retained.  

REMEDY 7: SECTION 2.5 PLAYGROUNDS

Submissions and Reasons

7.55    Sally Coop (Submission 14), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) support the proposed new playground.

7.56    Barbara Mawson (Submission 12) supports the inclusion of shade and additional seating in the new playground design.  Shannon Tait (Submission 31) requests that shade be provided in the new playground.

7.57    Jude Henderson (Submission 13) is supportive of the provision of play features for all ages and abilities and would like to ensure that the disability community is consulted with regard to the design of the playground. 

7.58    Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) supports the new playground but requests the inclusion of additional swings for juniors.

7.59    Alison Francis (Submission 8) supports the proposed new playground and the toilets adjacent, and requests that cycle parking is included in close proximity to the playground.

7.60    Grant Burney (Submission 2), Catherine Scott (Submission 5) and Graeme Mill (Submission 7) all support the new playground, however request the inclusion of additional features for teenagers and adults, including adult fitness equipment and adult swings. 

7.61    Nichola Dickinson (Submission 44) and James Dickinson (Submission 45) request that the playground equipment that is being replaced be relocated to Tamatea Street Reserve.

7.62    Linda Bruce (Submission 41) requests this section be updated to include reference to free play.

7.63    Patricia Reddy (Submission 55) is concerned that the new playground will require the removal of one tree to make room for the junior play area.

Analysis

7.64    While the existing children’s playground is ageing with limited play value, it is located in a beautiful setting, surrounded by the stream, mature trees, historic seats and bridges and the sports fields. 

7.65    The proposed design of the new playground is included in the Management Plan and respects the surrounding environment; highlighting the theme of water and oak trees, without impacting or encroaching on any historic features.   Play features for all ages and abilities are proposed as well as the provision of new amenities including toilets, shelter, furniture and drinking fountain.  In order to make optimal use of the existing site, and improve accessibility and integration with the former tea kiosk building, the Plan proposes the removal of a Redwood tree and 3 silver birch trees.  None of these trees are Protected Trees.  All other trees in this area are proposed to remain.

7.66    The central feature within the playground is an acorn tower with connecting rope structures and slides.  The height of the structure allows users to be up in the trees looking down on the playground below.  Other features include a flying fox; junior play area, raised mounds, swings, monkey bars, slides and spinners.  

7.67    The majority of the submissions are in support of the new playground, with specific requests for more swings, shade, cycle parking and consideration to more young adult play.

7.68    The Proposed Concept Plan and budget includes $100,000 towards shade, proposed over the swing area and junior play area.  Large trees retained around the edge will provide natural shading for rest and seating areas.  If adopted, this is sufficient budget that may enable further shade opportunities that may become apparent as the design progresses.

7.69    Officers have added two additional swings to the concept plan, bringing the total to 6, plus the large basket swing.  The new swings have replaced a balance piece that was considered a potential trip hazard where it was placed. There is therefore no increase in cost to the playground as originally estimated.  With regard to young adult equipment, there are a number of pieces proposed that are suited to this age group, in particular the large tower, flying fox, memory games and climbing towers.  Officers are confident that there is a wide variety of pieces that will suit children of all ages.

7.70    With regard to consultation with members of the disability community, officers have met with the Disability Reference Group on a number of occasions with regard to this plan, and have worked with a playground designer who specialises in all abilities playgrounds.   It has been discussed with the Reference Group as to the relocation of the liberty swing to another park or school, and officers will work with them further on this.  

7.71    With regard to adult fitness equipment, there is nothing currently proposed in the Plan.  Officers agree that the provision of fitness equipment for adult use would be beneficial to the wider use of the park, and have recommended the inclusion of an additional $50,000 to cover the cost of this. Officers will also work with other health care providers as they have in other parks for partnerships in the provision of these facilities. 

7.72    Linda Bruce requests the inclusion of reference to free play.  In her submission she states that parks provide the space for intergenerational fun and play for children of all ages.  She states that the proposed playground places the emphasis on physical play, however states that the integration of the playcentre philosophy of free play would encourage thinking of a wider range of possible play experiences and activities.  In particular Cornwall Park with its mature trees, wandering paths and diverse spaces provides the opportunity for many additional types of play such as adventure, scientific, invention of own stories and creativity and imagination.  

7.73    Officers support this submission from Linda Bruce, and recognise the value our parks and reserves offer to free play and imaginative and creative play.   The submission is supported with amendments to Page 24 as requested and identified in the recommendations below.


 

Relocate Playground Equipment to Tamatea Street Reserve

7.74    The existing equipment has been assessed by the Managing Director of Playco, the company who supplied this equipment 20 years ago.  He is also a Level 3 Playground Inspector.

7.75    When supplied, this equipment only had a 10-year structural guarantee and clearly in his opinion, as the original product manufacturer, it has out-lived its life expectancy. Equipment in the current market is typically now supplied with a 20-year structural guarantee. Visually it is noted most pieces have received forms of maintenance over the past 10 years to extend their life.

7.76    Playground posts may be reusable, although extensive effort will be needed to allow suitable removal of items from ground and concrete.

7.77    Platforms which were originally supplied as steel platforms have been replaced as timber, as an in-situ solution to extend the life of the equipment. These are not recommended for reuse.  Many components are no longer compliant under new rules, which would be enforced if application is made to relocate and re-install in a new park.

7.78    It is therefore not recommended that any of this equipment be relocated to Tamatea Street Reserve, given it would no longer comply with existing health and safety requirements.

7.79    With regard to providing a new playground on Tamatea Street Reserve, Officers note the following. 

7.80    Council currently provides and manages 42 playgrounds within the District, 12 of which are located in Hastings.  These require significant investment in their ongoing management and maintenance to ensure continued quality, play value, safety and amenity.  This investment must be carefully managed to ensure that these assets continue to meet the needs of the community, and that they offer the best value for the available resources.

7.81    The 2008 Play Strategy, and Long Term Plan identifies service targets, which provide an indication of the extent to which there is sufficient provision of Council open space, and access to playgrounds, and how many additional are required.  It states that 56% of residential properties should be within 500m of a playground.   Tamatea Street Reserve is located in the Mahora Census Area Unit, and based on 2018 census figures, currently only 49% of residential properties are within 500m of a playground.  As can be seen from the map below, the provision of a new playground in Tamatea Street Reserve, or St Aubyn Street Reserve, would remedy this deficit.

7.82    A new playground in Mahora (St Aubyn Street Reserve) was identified in the 2008 Playground Strategy, and $75,000 is set aside in 2019/20 financial year for the provision of a ‘Local Area’ playground, that will be allocated to an existing deficit area.  Consideration will be given to either Tamatea Street Reserve or St Aubyn Street Reserve, in consultation with the local community and consideration of existing uses of these reserves (ie for sports).

7.83    The submission of Patricia Reddy is concerned as to the removal of a tree to provide the new premier playground.  In the design of the premier playground that is included in the Concept Plan, Council engaged Arborlab to prepare an arboricultural report for the 29 trees that are in the direct vicinity of the proposed new playground.  Of these 29 trees, all are proposed to be retained as part of the plan, due to their excellent health and form, and ability to provide valuable shade and shelter for playground users, with the exception of two silver birch trees, and the Sequoiadendron (Tree 14483). 

7.84    The Sequoia tree is not protected in the District Plan, and is identified by Arborlab as ‘showing signs of decline, potentially due to root damage from the adjacent pathway’.  Arborlab state that should a decision be made to remove the tree, then a replacement planting regime should be implemented.  It may be beneficial to plant more mature trees to reduce the impact from losing this significant tree. 

7.85    In addition it states that the timber from the tree could be retained and used to build something that could be later reinstated into the park where it can be enjoyed by future generations, such as back into the playground.  

7.86    The Sequoia tree stands approximately 40m high and as identified above, has been assessed as in ‘good’ condition but showing signs of decline potentially due to root damage.   With the location of the children’s playground surrounded by the stream, sportsfields, event space and Coronation Fountain, there is limited space to provide a premier playground.   The location of the tree can be seen in the aerial photo below:

7.87    While the retention of the tree would be desirable, it could be argued that it has outgrown its environment, with particular regard to its close proximity to the children’s playground and historic former tea kiosk currently used by Cornwall Park playcentre.  If it were to be retained, it would require the relocation of the proposed ‘junior play’ area which includes 9 individual playground pieces specifically targeted for pre-schoolers. 

7.88    It is recommended that the submission be disallowed given that the tree has been assessed as showing signs of decline, it is not an outstanding tree protected in the District Plan; and is no longer considered appropriate to its surrounding adjacent to a premier playground.  

7.89    It is however recommended that Officers update page 18 of the Plan to include reference to the suggestion by Arborlab relating to the reuse of the timber from the tree, as identified in the Recommendations below.  It is recommended that an additional $20,000 be included in the budget relating to this work, although Officers will also contact the local Woodturners Guild and Menzshed who may wish to assist Council with these works.

Recommendations

7.90    That the submissions of Sally Coop (Submission 12), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) supporting the proposed new playground be allowed.

7.91    That the submission of Barbara Mawson (Submission 12), Jude Henderson (Submission 13) and Shannon Tait (Submission 31) supporting the playground design and inclusion of equipment for all ages and abilities, shade and furniture be allowed.

7.92    That the submission of Alison Francis (Submission 8) requesting that cycle parking is included in the design be allowed.

7.93    That the submissions of Grant Burney (Submission 2), Catherine Scott (Submission 5) and Graeme Mill (Submission 7) and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) supporting the playground and requesting additional features features for teenagers and adults, including adult fitness equipment and adult swings and junior swings be allowed in part insofar as adult and junior swings are included in the Plan, and allowed insofar as it is recommended to add additional funds to provide exercise equipment in the Park, while working with local health providers to seek partnerships for the provision of these.

7.94    That the submissions of Nichola Dickinson (Submission 44) and James Dickinson (Submission 45) requesting that the playground equipment that is being replaced be relocated to Tamatea Street Reserve disallowed in part insofar as the Cornwall Park playground equipment is not fit to be relocated; but allowed in part insofar as officers will consult with the community for the provision of a new modest playground in the Mahora area next financial year.

7.95    That the submission of Linda Bruce (Submission 41) requesting the inclusion of reference to free play be allowed and Page 24 ‘Recreation and Leisure’ be amended to add the following shown in red italics:

·      Recognise and provide for the provision of play experiences throughout the Park to encourage adventure, exploratory, discovery and free play.

7.96    That the submission of Patricia Reddy (Submission 55) regarding the removal of one tree for the playground be disallowed insofar as the Concept Plan be retained, however allowed in part insofar as the following recommendation from Arborlab be incorporated into Page 18 of the Plan by adding the following words shown in red italics:

Children’s Playground

In order to make optimal use of the existing site, and improve accessibility and integration with the former tea kiosk building the Plan proposes the removal of the redwood tree.  This is not a protected tree and has recently been assessed as showing signs of decline in some of its branches.  Council will retain the timber from the tree to be used to build something that can be later reinstated back into the playground where it can be enjoyed by future generations, such as in the free play area, furniture, artwork or other natural playground equipment in consultation with mana whenua, local artists and community groups.    

 

REMEDY 8: SIGNS

Submissions and Reasons

7.97    Alison McMinn (Submission 14) requests the provision of display boards to identify the significance of the rubble seats and walls.

Analysis

7.98    Section 2.9 states that there are a large number of seats, walls and bridges within the Park that were made out of earthquake rubble, that contribute to the character of the Park. Policy 2.9.6 states that Council will maintain these historic features for future generations to enjoy.

7.99    There are currently two large information boards in Cornwall Park – one at the Tomoana Road entrance beside the duck pond, and the other beside the children’s playground.  This information board contains the following words:

‘During 1934 several stone seats and bridges, designed by E.W.Garnett, were built using stone debris from the 1931 earthquake’….

7.100  The significance of these features is therefore already identified on the information boards, however more detail could be provided.  It is therefore recommended that if new display information boards are produced, more information will be provided on the significance of the rubble seats and walls.

Recommendation

7.101  That the submission of Alison McMinn (Submission 38) requesting the provision of display boards identifying the significance of the rubble seats and walls be allowed insofar as the two large information boards already identify the history of these features, however if new signs are created, more information will be provided on their significance.

REMEDY 9: SECTION 2.9 PARK FURNITURE

Submissions and Reasons

7.102  Catherine Scott (Submission 5) requests the inclusion of drinking fountains within the Park, including dog attachments.

Analysis

7.103  The inclusion of dog bowl attachments to drinking fountains has become a successful addition to the drinking fountains throughout the District, given the popularity of using our parks and reserves for dog walking.  

7.104  The concept plans will include a new drinking fountain as part of the new toilets that are being built.  Officers will ensure that a dog drinking bowl be incorporated as part of this design.

Recommendation

7.105  That the submission of Catherine Scott (Submission 5) be allowed insofar as a new drinking fountain will be included in the design of the new playground that will have a dog drinking bowl at the bottom.

REMEDY 10: SECTION 2.10 VEHICLE PARKING

Submissions and Reasons

7.106  Doug Honnor (Submission 33) and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) support the creation of angle parking along Roberts Street and Doug Honnor requests that the dish channel be removed.

7.107  Peter McNab (Submission 50) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) oppose the provision of angle parking due to potential health and safety risks, and opinion that it will not significantly increase the provision of parking.

Analysis

7.108  Policy 2.10.4 states that Council may provide marked angle parking along Cornwall Road and Roberts Street if required to meet additional demand.

7.109  A concept plan has been prepared that identifies that approximately 50 marked parallel carparking spaces could be formalised along the park edge of Roberts Street, taking into account walkway access points.  By comparison, approximately 100 marked angle parks could be formalised, doubling the available number of carparks.

7.110  The submission of Peter McNab is correct, in that parallel parking is considered safer and tends to have less crashes associated with manoeuvring than angle parking.  The Transportation Manager recommends that due to safety issues in an area with a number of children present that angle parking is not provided; and instead parallel parking be clearly line marked to ensure optimal use of the space.  

7.111  Given the above, it is recommended that Policy 2.10.4 be amended as detailed in the recommendations below.  Road safety can also be improved along Roberts and Kitchener Street by the installation of traffic calming measures, such as threshold treatments or narrowing the traffic lanes, with the goal of reducing speed past the park.

7.112  Doug Honnor also requests that the deep kerb and channel on Roberts Street be replaced with a shallow channel.     There are other examples of such deep dish drains throughout Hastings, including Terrace Road, Alexandra Street, St Leonard’s Avenue and Pepper Street. 

7.113  The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) are Council’s funding partner for most road activities. NZTA subsidises 54% of roading activity work as long as the work is identified in Council’s Activity Management Plan (AMP), and LTP submission.  Council’s AMP requires renewal works to be undertaken where best value for money principles are used.

7.114  In the case of Roberts Street, the existing kerb and channel is in adequate condition. Council undertakes kerb and channel renewal on streets like these when the road pavement is required to be rebuilt. Roberts Street is not planned to be rebuilt within the next 20 years. Replacement of the kerb and channel prematurely would contravene the LTP, and the AMP, and hence NZTA would not subsidise this activity.

7.115  Should Council wish to consider this request, it would require the replacement of the entire 390m street block, new kerb, reconstruction of all driveways, installation of new sumps and connections and replacement of all stormwater connections with an estimated cost of $120,000.   This is not currently included in any forward works programme, and this submission is therefore recommended to be disallowed.

Recommendations

7.116  That the submission of Doug Honnor (Submission 33) and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) supporting the creation of angle parking; be disallowed insofar as Policy 2.10.4 be amended as follows:

2.10.4       Formalise marked angle parallel parking spaces along Cornwall Road and Roberts Street with road markings to ensure optimal use of the space and identification of pedestrian accessways. Only consider the provision of marked angle parking in the future if required to meet additional demand in the future, and if health and safety risks can be addressed through improved road design.

7.117  That the submission of Peter McNab (Submission 50) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) opposing the provision of angle parking be allowed insofar as Policy 2.10.4 be amended as above.

7.118  That the submission of Doug Honnor (Submission 33) requesting the removal of the dish channels be disallowed.

REMEDY 11: SECTION 2.12 PATHWAY NETWORKS

Submissions and Reasons

7.119  Sally Coop (Submission 14), Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) and Barbara Mawson (Submission 12) support the proposed new pathways within the park and requests that the pathway improvements be included as a higher priority in the Action Plan, to improve accessibility for people with mobility issues.

Analysis

7.120  Policy 2.12.2 states that states that new pathways will be created to improve access to and around the park, and in particular to features and facilities.  The proposed new walkways include:

(a)  Cricket Green Walkway, along Tomoana and Cornwall Road

(b)  Rose Garden Link along Roberts Street

(c)  Ornamental Lake Perimeter Walkway

(d)  Coronation Fountain Connectivity Pathways

7.121  Funding is currently proposed to be included as follows:

 

Description

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

TOTAL

Cricket Walkway

 

 

 

$100,000

 

 

Rose Garden Walkway

 

 

 

$40,000

 

 

Duck Pond Walkway

 

 

 

$65,000

 

 

Fountain Walkway

 

$90,000

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

$90,000

 

$205,000

 

 

7.122  The proposed capital works programme for Cornwall Park has been spread over a 5 year period, in recognition of other funding priorities of Council in other parks as well as programming of work.

7.123  The key priority for Council in the next two financial years is the premier playground, given the condition of the existing play facility.  The new pathway around the Coronation Fountain will be undertaken at the same time.   The other new pathways are currently scheduled in 2021/22 which Officers are comfortable with in terms of priorities and current workloads.  Minor improvements to existing pathways for safety reasons will however be carried out as part of the existing forward renewal programme.


 

Recommendations

7.124  That the submissions of Sally Coop (Submission 14), Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) and Barbara Mawson (Submission 12) supporting the proposed new pathways within the park and requesting that the pathway improvements be included as a higher priority in the Action Plan, to improve accessibility for people with mobility issues be allowed in part insofar as the creation of new pathways are currently proposed for 2021/22; but that minor improvements to the safety of existing pathways will be carried out as part of existing forward renewal programme.

REMEDY 12: SECTION 3.1 TREES AND GARDENS

Submissions and Reasons

7.125  Catherine Scott (Submission 5) requests that more trees within the Park are labelled and that living walls could be incorporated as photo backdrops.

7.126  Alison Francis (Submission 8) supports the consideration of management and succession planning of the trees within the Park.

7.127  Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) requests that the native garden be beautified with native planting to provide food and shelter to wildlife; and that the character of the Osmanthus Gardens is not compromised by plant removal for security.

Analysis

7.128  The submission of Catherine Scott requests that significant trees be labelled and this is supported by officers. There are 23 outstanding trees within the Park that are protected under the provisions of the District Plan and officers are supportive of labels being added to these trees for education and information purposes.  Some of the trees have been labelled in the past with mixed success, so officers will identify a more permanent solution that does not impact on the health or wellbeing of the trees.

7.129  With regard to a living wall, this may be considered in any future upgrades of buildings and structures within the Park, including bird aviary, former tea kiosk or Holt Memorial Display House.

7.130  The submission of Friends of Cornwall Park requests that the native garden be enhanced.   The Plan in Section 3.1 recognises that importance of the native area for wildlife in the Park, and states that naturally occurring indigenous plant communities are the most appropriate vegetation to establish within these areas.  This is planned within the Park, and is supported by existing Policy 3.1.7 of the Plan which states as follows:

3.1.7      Enhance the native and riparian areas with a range of indigenous plant species to provide safe habitat for wildlife.

7.131  The Friends of Cornwall Park also request that the character of the Osmanthus Gardens not be compromised by plant removal for security.  Page 19 of Plan states that while the Osmanthus Gardens are a popular area appreciated for its peaceful and serene environment, it structures and enclosures can be exploited for unwanted anti-social behavior both during the day and night.  It is recommended that part of the Gardens be opened up to the rest of the park by the removal of some of the densely planted areas.

7.132  Officers recognise the concerns of the Friends of Cornwall Park regarding the removal of some of the areas within the garden, and also recognise their expertise in these matters.  It is therefore recommended that a new policy be included in the Plan recognizing this, as identified in the recommendation below.

Recommendation

7.133  That the submission of Catherine Scott (Submission 5) be allowed in part insofar as a new policy be added to Section 3.1 and Section 6.0 of the Plan as follows:

3.1.9       Provide labels to identify all significant and outstanding trees within the Park for education and information purposes.

6.0          Action List and Timeframes

NO.

POLICY

ACTION

SHORT TERM

14

3.1

Label all significant and outstanding trees within the Park

 

 

7.134  That the submission of Alison Francis (Submission 8) be allowed insofar as the Policy relating to the succession planning and tree management plan be retained in the Plan.

7.135  That the submission of Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) requesting that the native garden be beautified with native planting to provide food and shelter to wildlife and that the character of the Osmanthus Garden is not compromised by plant removal for security be allowed insofar as Policy 3.1.7 be retained in the Plan, and that a new Policy 3.1.8 be added to the Plan as follows:

3.1.10     Consult the Friends of Cornwall Park in the preparation and implementation of any significant planting or shrub removal plans outside of any general maintenance or renewal work programmes, particularly in the Native Area and Osmanthus Gardens, taking into account both the safety of park users, as well as the amenity and habitat benefits of these areas.

 

REMEDY 13: SECTION 3.3 WATER

Submissions and Reasons

7.136  David Renouf (Submission 1) submits that in order to improve water quality, that Council should increase the quantity of water into the stream via bore 2; undertake to seal the pond due to seepage; dredge the stream of sediment and install sediment weirs near the stormwater discharge point. He also requests increased maintenance to regularly remove collected sediment.

7.137  Sally Coop (Submission 14), Helen Whittaker (Submission 24), Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) support the provisions included in the Plan relating to enhancing and improving water quality within the waterways in the Park but request they be a higher priority and request regular maintenance and additional planting for wildlife.

Analysis

7.138  As stated in the Plan, the Cornwall Park Aquatic System can be classified into three distinct habitats: (1) Duck Pond; (2) Osmanthus Garden Pond; and (3) Stream.

7.139  The Duck Pond is located on the Tomoana Road boundary of the Park, and was artificially constructed with a small island in the centre.  The water source for the pond is a borehole which is about 6m deep. The pond is generally oval shaped, approximately 60m long and 35m wide.  A concrete retaining wall is retaining the earth around the pond, which according to survey plans, ranges in height between 600-700mm.  A spillway is present at the southwest corner of the pond.  A significant amount of seepage occurs out of the pond.  When all pumps and water sources to the pond are shut off, the pond empties itself in a matter of three to five days. 

7.140  The Osmanthus Garden Pond has a solid concrete base and is fed via groundwater bores.  Two small interconnected ponds are located to the north of the main pond and are fed by groundwater.  These ultimately discharge into the main pond. 

7.141  The Cornwall Park Stream that runs through Cornwall Park is the remnant of a naturally occurring stream. The riparian areas surrounding the stream are a mixture of mowed edges and ornamental gardens that are largely managed for amenity value only. The stream flow is controlled by a weir that is located just before the stream exits the park near Cornwall Road, and is also used for storm water drainage from the surrounding residential areas. The water within the stream is slow moving and the stream bed regularly builds up with refuse, branches and leaves.

7.142  An Environmental Study of the Cornwall Park waterbodies was commissioned in 2018 with the aim to provide information regarding water quality; amenity and ecological value; and options to enhance their amenity and ecological value. The findings of this study form the basis for the policies included in this Plan, and noted the following: 

·        The Duck Pond and Stream are highly modified shallow systems that suffer from high nutrient, organic matter and temperature loadings;

·        There is very little flow within the system to facilitate contaminant removal/dilution;

·        Factors such as high temperature, decaying vegetation and low flows mean there is little oxygenation of the water;  

·        Aquatic species in the Duck Pond are limited to the native Longfin Eel.

·        The Stream contains only a total of three species; Mosquito Fish, Common Goldfish and Longfin Eel.

·        Odours emanating from the pond and stream are predominantly due to the degradation or ‘rotting’ of organic matter.

·        There is low biodiversity within the Cornwall Park Aquatic System.

7.143  Mr Renouf submits that in order to improve water quality, that Council should increase the quantity of water into the stream via bore 1406; undertake to seal the pond due to seepage; dredge the stream of sediment and install sediment weirs near the stormwater discharge point.  

Bore 1406

7.144  The existing consent condition of Bore 1406 allows a take of 2.5l/s with a maximum of 1500 cubic meters per week.  The flow is set just below the consent with a throttle to ensure that Council does not breach the consent allowance.

Sediment Weirs

7.145  With regard to a request to install sediment weirs near the stormwater discharge points.  There is limited potential for significant amounts of sediment to be discharged into the stream. The Osmanthus Garden pond is bore feed and velocities by the length of the stream is low.  A water control weir is already in place.  Improvements can be made to this weir as part of any park upgrade work such as cleaning out the sludge in the stream and upgrading the existing weir.

Draining, Dredge and Ongoing Maintenance

7.146  The Reserve Management Plan proposes that a progressive restoration programme be implemented to enhance the waterway and surrounding riparian margins; and greatly increase the recreational and environmental value of the aquatic environment. The proposed restoration programme includes a two stage process of (1) Draining and Dredging the Pond and Stream; followed by (2) Riparian Planting.  $385,000 is included in 2021/22 of the Long Term Plan for this work.

7.147  Draining and Dredging will: 1) cause the desiccation and death of most pest aquatic weed and fish species in the pond; 2) trap and remove any desirable fish species such as goldfish and eels in quantities substantial enough to permit re-establishment of their population; and 3) allow for the easier removal of submerged organic matter and other sediment components for removal to landfill.

7.148  Once the pond and stream system has been suitably ‘cleaned’ of pest weed and fish species the implementation of a suitable riparian planting plan would have the long-term advantage of improving the terrestrial habitat as well as limiting the ingress of waterfowl.

7.149  Planting of the waterway with wetland species in the shallower margins would aid the removal of nutrients and improve the general ecological qualities of the system.  Weed growth would need to be monitored and removed periodically when required during the initial stages of the riparian cover restoration until a canopy was established.

7.150  Improved stream dynamics and riparian management will not only benefit the stream and its immediate environs, it will also have a flow on effect to the downstream receiving waters, terrestrial biodiversity and public awareness of environmental issues. Targeted riparian restoration as well as careful reconstruction of the flows and bed dynamics will greatly enhance the general ecology of the area by increasing indigenous habitat, reducing weed growth and maintaining stable water temperatures. 

7.151  With regard to the other submissions requesting regular maintenance of the waterways, officers are working with Recreational Services with regard to an improved maintenance regime in this area moving forward. Cleaning of the waterways will be done on an as needed basis as this requires specialist plant and equipment and the first clean-up was carried out in February. In addition, a provisional amount of $10,000/annum would be required to further improve stream quality.

7.152  Officers will be monitoring waterway condition closely. Embankment weed control is a scheduled activity in the new maintenance contract and this will be enhanced with embankment planting as a shrub renewal activity moving forward to improve the waterway condition.  

7.153  Officers are cognisant of some complaints over the condition of the duck pond.  The sludge is created primarily by it being a popular habitat for ducks.  The LTP allocates fund to address this in 2021/22 as full restoration to a natural vegetated habitat, not a lined, formal amenity feature.  If Council wishes to address this issue sooner, it will need to change the funding stream.  It could consider the dredging of the pond in the first instance, which will come at a cost of $100,000.  Council could either bring this money forward or allocate additional funds via rates in 2019/20.

Recommendation

7.154  That the submission of David Renouf (Submission 1) relating to the quality of water in the duck pond and stream in Cornwall Park be allowed in part insofar as $385,000 is included in 2021/22 for restoration of the pond and stream in the Park. 

7.155  That the submissions of Sally Coop (Submission 14), Helen Whittaker (Submission 24), Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) supporting the provision included in the Plan relating to water; and requesting regular maintenance and additional planting for wildlife be allowed insofar as regular maintenance is included in the new contract with Recreational Services, together with programmed enhancement work.

 

REMEDY 14: SECTION 3.5 PLANT AND ANIMAL PESTS

Submissions and Reasons

7.156  Grant Burney (Submission 2) requests that weed and prickle control is carried out regularly around the children’s playground for weeds such as Onehunga Weed.

Analysis

7.157  The control of Onehunga Weed is included as part of the contract with Recreation Services, and will be undertaken as part of the Spring Sportsfield renovation programme and will be extended to include key passive recreation areas, including the playground grass.

Recommendation

7.158  That the submission of Grant Burney (Submission 2) be allowed insofar as the control of Onehunga Weed in Cornwall Park will be extended to the playground area as part of the contract with Recreation Services.

 

REMEDY 15: SECTION 4.1 CULTURE AND HERITAGE

Submissions and Reasons

7.159  Heritage New Zealand (Submission 52) request a number of amendments to the Plan relating to culture and heritage.

Analysis

7.160  Heritage New Zealand support the recognition of historical and cultural features and values in the Draft Plan, but request further detail in various sections.  Officers have been in contact with Heritage New Zealand, who have endorsed the following recommendations.

Recommendation

7.161  That the submission of Heritage New Zealand (Submission 52) requesting amendments to the Plan be allowed insofar as the following changes be made:

Amend Page 4 (Legislation) to include the following section:

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014

The Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 replaced the Historic Places Act 1993 on 20 May 2014.  As stated on the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga website, the new legislation reforms the governance of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust in line with its status as a Crown entity and streamlines many procedures under the Act. For example, the new archaeological provisions are intended to improve efficiency, reduce costs, and improve alignment with the Resource Management Act 1991. 

 

As owners of heritage places (such as buildings, parks, reserves, infrastructure, and archaeological sites), local authorities must meet relevant statutory requirements and comply with plan rules for land they own and administer.  Local authorities can set a good example for heritage management in the district or region (and to the wider community) by ensuring that their own assets have been researched and evaluated for their heritage values, and are managed in accordance with conservation principles.

Amend Page 16 as follows:

King George V Coronation Drinking Fountain

The Coronation Fountain Lions Monument has a Category II New Zealand Historic Places Trust classification. The King George V Coronation Drinking Fountain is on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero as a Historic Place Category 2 (List Number 1078).  The fountain was constructed in 1911 to mark the coronation of King George V.

Amend Page 18 ‘Historical and Cultural Values’ as follows:

 

As an important community and sporting attraction, the Park must be managed in a way that is sensitive to changing user demands and expectations, whilst still retaining and protecting those heritage features that contribute to its unique character.

Amend Section 2.12 to add the following paragraph:

A new pathway is proposed to recognise and enhance the accessibility and importance of the Coronation Fountain within its surroundings.  The extent of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga List entry for the Coronation Fountain includes a 2 metre curtilage from the platform’s edge and in all direction.  Proposals near the Fountain will require careful planning and implementation in order to appropriately relate to the Coronation Fountain, including the curtilage and wider setting.  Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga will be consulted on this matter.

Amend Section 4.1 Cultural & Heritage Significance as follows:

 

A number of parks within the District contain sites of heritage significance, such as buildings, landscapes, structures, archaeological sites and trees. Many of these are listed in the Historic Places Trust Register, and include registered historic places, historic areas, registered Waahi Tapu sites and recorded archaeological sites. Trees of outstanding heritage values are also identified under the Notable Trees Registration Scheme. Many of these heritage resources have protection under the Historic Places Act New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero, or the District Plan. 

There are a number of sites of historic heritage within Cornwall Park, including 13 Outstanding Trees as identified in the Hastings District Plan; the Coronation Fountain which has a Category II registration under the Historic Places Trust (No.1078); the King George V Coronation Drinking Fountain is on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero as a Historic Place Category 2 (List Number 1078),  as well as historic stone bridges over the waterways and stone seats and walls throughout the park made of earthquake rubble in the 1930s. 

Amend Policy 4.1 by deleting the incorrect policies 5.1.1 – 5.1.4 and replacing with the following:

Objective

4.1.1     To identify, maintain and protect any historic sites and features of special community interest so as to preserve and enrich public awareness of our heritage.  

Policy

4.1.2     To ensure the protection and preservation of all historic and cultural features, and where appropriate display information as to their significance.

 

REMEDY 16: SECTION 5.1 MAINTENANCE

Submissions and Reasons

7.162  Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Patricia Reddy (Submission 55) request the improvement of maintenance in the Park and that a full time staff member be appointed to this Park.

Analysis

7.163  Section 5.1 of the Plan currently states as follows:

The management and operation of the Park has been undertaken collectively between the Parks Asset Management Team and the Maintenance Group (Parks Service Delivery Unit).  From 2019 maintenance of the Park will be undertaken by Recreational Services, an external contractor to Council.  The management of the Park must take into account the objectives and policies of this Plan and the agreed service levels.

7.164  From February 2019 the maintenance of all of the District’s parks, reserves and open spaces, including Cornwall Park is contracted by Council to Recreational Services.  The contract includes mowing, sportsground preparation, toilet cleaning and playground, gardens and tree maintenance.

7.165  With regard to Cornwall Park, the contract provides for a custodian to spend 4 hours per day (5 days per week) in the Aviary and Holt House; and 2 gardeners to each spend 4 hours per day (5 mornings per week) for bins, loose litter collection, gardening and general parks maintenance.  A total of 12 labour hours is therefore currently spent in the park 5 days per week.  This is however all morning work, therefore there is no presence in the park after midday.  

7.166  This work excludes unscheduled items which are separated funded, and includes pond cleaning, reactive repairs and maintenance, sports field renovations, tree maintenance, and sportsfield watering.

7.167  If Council were to agree to increase the hours so that there was a full time custodian in the park 8 hours per day, 7 days per week, as requested by the submitters then an additional allocation of $78,000 would be required to be added to the contract with Recreational Services.

7.168  However, given that Recreational Services are currently only one month into their contract, it is recommended that Council reassess this at the end of the first year of the contract.  This annual operating budget will also require reassessment as new facilities are added to the park, including the premier playground.

7.169  It is therefore recommended that Section 5.1 be updated and amended as identified in the recommendation below.

Recommendation

7.170  That the submissions of Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Patricia Reddy (Submission 55) requesting the improvement of maintenance in the Park be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as Section 5.1 of the Plan is amended by deleting those words shown as struck out and adding those words shown in red italics as follows:

5.1          MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

The management and operation of the Park has been undertaken collectively between the Parks Asset Management Team and the Maintenance Group (Parks Service Delivery Unit).  From February 2019 the maintenance of all the District’s parks, reserves and open spaces, including Cornwall Park will be is contracted by Council to undertaken by Recreational Services. an external contractor to CouncilThe contract includes mowing, sportsground preparation, toilet cleaning, and playground, gardens and tree maintenance to specified Levels of Service; and takes The management of the park must take into account the objectives and policies of this Plan and the agreed service levels.  These service levels will be reviewed on an annual basis to recognise the importance of Cornwall Park as the premier park of the District; and as new facilities are added to the park or increased levels of service are agreed, these will increase annual operating costs.


 

REMEDY 17: SECTION 5.3 LEASES

Submissions and Reasons

7.171  Grant Burney (Submission 2), Helen Curran (Submission 3), Alison Francis (Submission 8), Emily Davenport (Submission 20), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) support Policy 5.3.8 (and 2.2.17) and the intention to restore the former tea kiosk to be made available for community use, or a café at the expiration of lease with the Cornwall Park Playcentre.

7.172  Elliot Pritchard (Submission 6), Ministry of Education (Submission 11), Susy Ratcliffe (Submission 17), Oliver Styles (Submission 18), Annabel Beattie (Submission 19),  Connie Moroney (Submission 21), Janka McBeth (Submission 22), Pia Bradshaw (Submission 23), Hallie Barclay (Submission 25), Angel Clarke (Submission 26), Vicki Hope (Submission 28), Michelle Hutton (Submission 29), Frances Martin (Submission 30), Nicola Marett (Submission 32), Cornwall Park Playcentre (Submission 34), Tony McBride (Submission 35), Rebecca Hill (Submission 36), Hana Ruth (Submission 37), Jenny Epplett (Submission 43), Amy Hutchinson (Submission 46), New Zealand Playcentre Federation (Lower North Island Region) (Submission 47), Ashridge Road Playcentre (Submission 48), Amy Hopkinson-Styles (Submission 49),  Ruth Vincent (Submission 51), Genevieve and Simon Renall (Submission 53), Margaret McBride (Submission 56) and Alice Corkran (Submission 56) request the renewal of the lease of the former tea kiosk building to Cornwall Park Playcentre.

7.173  John Ruth (Submission 27) opposes the suggested future uses of the former tea kiosk as a café, stating that this would create a health and safety issue when cricket is being played on the adjacent fields.   He supports the continued use of the building by Playcentre.

7.174  Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) request that the Playcentre be offered a short term lease while discussions take place.

Background

7.175  The analysis in this section of the report relates to the future use of the former tea kiosk building, and whether Council (a) extends the lease to Cornwall Park Playcentre; or (b) considers options for alternative community uses.

7.176  The former tea kiosk building overlooking the Cricket Green was built for the purpose of a tea kiosk, rest room and community buildings in 1929 and designed by Hastings architect Harold Davies.  It was used for this purpose up until 1970, when a fire destroyed the kitchen, and the lease was awarded to Hawke’s Bay Playcentre Association.   While disputed by a submitter, the building is referred to throughout the Plan as the ‘former tea kiosk building’ given that this was the reason that public funds were used to build it, and was its original community purpose.

7.177  The current lease to the Hawke’s Bay Playcentre Association Incorporated dated 10 September 2007 provides for a term of 12 years with no right of renewal.  The final expiry of the current lease is 10 September 2019. 

7.178  The building and land is owned by Council.  The current rental cost for exclusive rights to occupy the building and an adjacent 350m2 area of open space is $600 per annum.  This aligns with charges adopted by Council in the 2018/19 Annual Plan.  The playcentre is open four mornings per week, typically accommodating 17 children.

7.179  While the long history that Playcentre has with this building is recognised, given the upcoming expiry of the lease, and the location of the building in a premier park, it was considered timely to reconsider the future use of this Council owned building. There is a distinct lack of community facilities available within parks and reserves, and those available are highly sought after.  It is for this reason that Council typically seeks such facilities to be multi-use and multi-function.

7.180  The restoration and reintegration of this building into the park for wider community use, and to facilitate greater enjoyment of it, needs to be considered against the desire of the Playcentre to continue their lease and exclusive use, as Council would do at the expiration of any long term lease on its facilities.   A number of alternative uses were requested by the community during the consultation, including shelter, tearooms and community meeting spaces.

7.181  At the expiry of the lease to Cornwall Park Playcentre in 2019, the Draft Management Plan proposed that Council will consider alternative uses of the building to maximise public use, and work with Cornwall Park Playcentre to facilitate their potential relocation to an alternative site or building within the vicinity if this is required.

Analysis

7.182  35 submissions have been received relating to the provisions included in the Plan with regard to the former tea kiosk building and the lease to the playcentre.  Of these 28 are in support of the lease to playcentre being renewed; 6 support alternative community uses of the building; and 1 requests a one year lease extension to playcentre while discussions are held.   

7.183  A concession by definition is a permit, lease or licence which allows activity authorised by the concession document under the provisions of Section 59A of the Reserves Act 1977.  The Act places limitations on activities that are permitted on this site and in this building.   The playcentre activity is not consistent with the land classification under that Act which is designated Recreation Reserve.  This however can be easily rectified via a subdivision and reclassification process as Local Purpose Reserve of that part of the land occupied by the building.

Cornwall Park Playcentre

7.184  27 submissions have been received in support of playcentre remaining on Cornwall Park.  These submissions describe the value of playcentre to the needs of children; it’s occupation on the park for 49 years, providing guardianship of the park; sense of belonging; helping families who are new to the region and the fact that it is a not for profit organisation.

7.185  The Cornwall Park Playcentre have advised Council they would like to renew the expiring lease, and request that the terms be amended to allow them to hire it out at their discretion to other not for profit groups.

7.186  This does not however extend to them sharing the building with other groups on a regular basis, as occurs in other facilities in the District.  There are practical and legal difficulties for this, which would mean that they would need to completely back up the building at the end of each session. What is being proposed is the ability for Playcentre to hire out the centre to community organisations.

7.187  Officers do not dispute any of the submissions received relating to the value of playcentre to the community, and the value it brings to Cornwall Park.  Members have a clear association with the park, and it is their absolute preference to remain. 

Alternative Community Uses

7.188  6 submissions support the consideration of alternative uses of the building, and restoring it to its original community use.  The submission from Friends of Cornwall Park states that ‘many’ of its 107 members support this initiative, however this number is not quantified. 1 submission has been received that requests an extension to the lease for one year while further discussions are held.

7.189  In addition to the above submissions, during consultation with the Disability Reference Group they identified that adequately equipped bathroom facilities could be provided in the building to meet the specific needs of adults and children with physical disabilities or specific requirements.  Provision of such facilities in a more private location would enable people of all abilities to get out, use the park, and enjoy the day-to-day activities that many of us take for granted.   While the new facilities beside the playground will be fully accessible, these don’t meet the needs of all disabled people.  People who are unable to weight bear due to profound and multiple learning difficulties, brain injury or age-related health issues, often need extra equipment and space to enable them to be changed or use the bathroom safely.

7.190  Community buildings and facilities provide spaces where members of the community can connect, socialise, learn and participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities.  These activities can foster improved lifestyles, relationships, and a sense of belonging and pride among the community.  As with the Mackersey Family Pavilion in the Village Green, this is booked on a regular basis for community activities, events, holiday programmes, cultural activities, crafts and hobbies programmes, and birthday parties and by groups such as Age Concern and Run Walk Hawkes Bay.

7.191  Indeed it is these exact benefits that are reflected in many of the submissions received in support of Playcentre remaining in the building; stating their connection and sense of belonging to the park, and the benefits it brings to their group and children.

7.192  In addition there is a desire from some of the submitters to see the full heritage beauty of this historic building restored for the enjoyment of future generations.


 

How do we move forward?

7.193  Officers recognise that the community are extremely passionate about this subject; and:

 

·        that the building has historic value and significance to Cornwall Park and the community;

·        that Cornwall Park Playcentre wish to renew their lease, given their long association with the Park, and concerns regarding their financial ability to relocate to an alternative site;

·        the value that Playcentre brings to the community and the Park;

·        the value that the building may bring to other members of the community and groups should it be made available;

7.194  In recognition of the above, consideration should be given to:

 

·        the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition, including the removal of alterations made in the 1970’s;

·        the cost to upgrade the building for community use (including kitchen and bathrooms);

·        the size of the building, and legal requirements that make it problematic for Playcentre to share the facility with other community groups.  

·        whether there is there a solution that would address the needs of all parties, including the restoration of the historic building

·        is there potential for Playcentre to build their own purpose built facility adjacent to/or as an extension to the building for their exclusive use; and what funds may be available from Playcentre New Zealand, investment partners, sponsors or community funds to contribute?

7.195  Officers have met with an architect and builder and consider that there may be a solution that could address a number of the considerations above.  It would see the building restored to its original condition with external verandah and upgraded to provide community room, kitchen and bathroom facilities.  Playcentre could then build an extension at the rear of the building for their exclusive use.  To save costs, they could have exclusive use of the communal spaces of the main building (including kitchen and bathrooms) during Playcentre hours.  At all other times, this community space could be available for hire.  The Playcentre component of the building would have a separate lockable spaces for their exclusive use, including office, sleeping area, play area and direct access to fenced outdoor play area.  This part of the building and outdoor area would not be available for hire, meaning that Playcentre would not have to clear areas away or remove personal information at the end of each day.   Plans will be made available at the hearing of submissions of what this could look like.

7.196  Officers have spoken to New Zealand Playcentre Federation about the concept and the ability of Cornwall Park Playcentre to access funds for this project.   While there are funds of up to $200,000 available for such capital projects, this is a nationwide amount that would need to be applied for with full feasibility and cost assessment included.  

7.197  Given the time required to thoroughly investigate the feasibility of the above, officers recommend that the lease to the Cornwall Park Playcentre be extended for a further one year following its expiration on 10 September 2019.  

7.198  During that time, officers will (a) work with New Zealand Playcentre Federation and Cornwall Park Playcentre to investigate the feasibility, including financial costs of building a purpose built playcentre facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park; and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) identify the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and identification of potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute; and report back to Council prior to the expiry of the extended lease on 10 September 2020.

7.199  Officers have discussed this response with Cornwall Park Playcentre, who are supportive of the above recommendation providing: (a) they had secure long term lease or ownership of their part of the building to protect their investment; (b) they would have exclusive use of the community area during playcentre hours; (c) they had the same or similar outdoor area; and (d) any redesigned space would need to comply with the Ministry of Education’s ECE Standards.

7.200  Officers do not anticipate that there would be any issues in meeting these above requirements of Playcentre, all of which would be considered in detail during the feasibility stage prior to being presented back to Council.

 

Recommendation

7.201  That the submissions of Grant Burney (Submission 2), Helen Curran (Submission 3) and Alison Francis (Submission 8), Emily Davenport (Submission 20), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) supporting Policy 5.3.8 (and 2.2.17) and requesting that the former tea kiosk be made available for community use, or a café at the expiration of lease with the Cornwall Park playcentre; be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as the Plan be amended as identified below.

7.202  That the submissions of Elliot Pritchard (Submission 6), Ministry of Education (Submission 11), Susy Ratcliffe (Submission 17), Oliver Styles (Submission 18), Annabel Beattie (Submission 19),  Connie Moroney (Submission 21), Janka McBeth (Submission 22), Pia Bradshaw (Submission 23), Hallie Barclay (Submission 25), Angel Clarke (Submission 26), Vicki Hope (Submission 28), Michelle Hutton (Submission 29), Frances Martin (Submission 30), Nicola Marett (Submission 32), Cornwall Park Playcentre (Submission 34), Tony McBride (Submission 35), Rebecca Hill (Submission 36), Hana Ruth (Submission 37), Jenny Epplett (Submission 43), Amy Hutchinson (Submission 46), New Zealand Playcentre Federation (Lower North Island Region) (Submission 47), Ashridge Road Playcentre (Submission 48), Amy Hopkinson-Styles (Submission 49),  Ruth Vincent (Submission 51), Genevieve and Simon Renall (Submission 53), Margaret McBride (Submission 56) and Alice Corkran (Submission 57) requesting the renewal of the lease of the former tea kiosk building to Cornwall Park Playcentre be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as the Plan be amended as identified below.

7.203  That the submission of John Ruth (Submission 27) opposing the suggested future uses of the former tea kiosk as a café, stating that this would create a health and safety issue when cricket is being played on the adjacent fields.   He supports the continued use of the building by Playcentre be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as the Plan be amended as identified below.

7.204  That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) requesting that the Playcentre be offered a short term lease while discussions take place be allowed.

7.205  It is recommended that the Plan be amended by deleting the words shown as struck out, and adding those shown in red italics:

 

Pg. 9:   Issues & Opportunities

Former Tea Kiosk Building

 

…… Council will consider the future use alternative uses of the former tea kiosk building at the expiration of the current an extended lease to Cornwall Park Playcentre that may facilitate will consider the optimal use of the building to meet the needs of the wider community, while taking into account the long association of Cornwall Park Playcentre with the park and the benefits they provide to the community.use and enjoyment

 

2.2     Buildings

 

The former tea kiosk building overlooking the Cricket Green is owned by Council. The Cornwall Park Playcentre lease to occupy the former tea kiosk building expires in 2019.  The lease provides them with the exclusive use of the building and an adjacent 350m2 of open space. 

 

While Council recognises the long history that Playcentre has with this building, its use does not meet the primary purpose of a Recreation Reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.  A playcentre should be located on a Local Purpose Reserve.  Following a decision on the long term use of the building, Council may need to apply to the Minister of Conservation to change the classification to reflect the approved use.

 

2.2.17     Consider the future use of and/or extension to the former tea kiosk building in accordance with requirements of the Reserves Act 1977, a desire to obtain maximum community benefits from this historic building, while recognising the long association that Playcentre has with the park, and the community benefit they provide through children’s play and development.

 

5.3     Leases, Licences and Permits

 

The Hawkes Bay Playcentre Association has a 12 year lease to occupy the former tea kiosk building for use as Cornwall Park Playcentre, expiring in 2019.  Council recognises the long association that the playcentre has with Cornwall Park, and their desire to continue to occupy the building, and their association with the park.  At the expiry of their current lease in 2019, Council will provide a one year extension, and during this time work with them and New Zealand Playcentre Federation to investigate the feasibility, including financial implications of (a) building a purpose built playcentre or community facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute. consider other alternative uses of the building to maximise public use such as shelter, community meeting or function rooms or café, and work with the Cornwall Park Playcentre to facilitate their relocation to an alternative park if a decision is made not to renew their lease.

 

5.3.8       Consider alternative uses of the former tea kiosk building that may facilitate wider community use and enjoyment of the Park prior to the renewal of a lease to Hawke’s Bay Playcentre Association. Extend the existing lease with the Cornwall Park Playcentre to occupy the former tea kiosk building for a further period of one year from 10 September 2019.  

 

5.3.9       Investigate the feasibility, including financial implications of (a) building a purpose built playcentre or community facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute; and report back to Council prior to the expiry of the extended lease on 10 September 2020.

 

6.0     Action List & Timeframes

 

16.     Consider the restoration and alternative uses of the former tea kiosk building to maximise public use such as shelter, meeting rooms or café, and work with the Cornwall Park playcentre to facilitate their relocation to an alternative site such as Duke Street Reserve. Investigate the feasibility, including financial implications of (a) building a purpose built playcentre or community facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute; and report back to Council prior to the expiry of the extended lease on 10 September 2020.

 

REMEDY 18: SECTION 5.5 NETWORK UTILITIES

Submissions and Reasons

7.206  Powerco Limited (Submission 10) support Policy 5.5.3 of the Plan related to Network Utilities and requests that it remain in the Plan unchanged

Analysis

7.207  Only one submission in support was received relating to Section 5.5 Network Utilities.

7.208  This submission is therefore allowed and no recommendation is made to change the Policy.

Recommendation

7.209  That the submission of Powerco Limited (Submission 10) be allowed. 

 


 

REMEDY 19: SECTION 5.9 RESERVE BOUNDARIES

Submissions and Reasons

7.210  Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) request that the upgrade of the area behind Eversley Rest Home is mindful that this area is a refuge for wildlife, and that these works should be carried out under general maintenance.

Analysis

7.211  The submitters are correct in that this area, in part due to its difficult public access is a refuge for wildlife.  General maintenance and improvement of this area will be carried out with careful regard to wildlife in this area and their habitat.   The submitters are also correct in that the majority of this work will be carried out under general maintenance.

7.212  Officers are however interested in working with residents of the adjoining Eversley Rest Home to assist in the improvement of their outlook, which is currently towards the back of the large utility shed. 

7.213  Officers will work with local artists and residents to see if this could be beautified in the form of a mural, to improve the outlook of this important reserve neighbour.  

Recommendation

7.214  That the submissions of Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) regarding the maintenance of the area behind Eversley Rest Home be allowed insofar as maintenance will have regard to the habitat of the wildlife in this area; be carried out as part of regular park maintenance, but that Council will work with residents of Eversley Rest Home to beautify the back wall of the utility shed with a mural.

8.0       FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

8.1       As can be seen from Table 3, there is $1,545,000 included in Years 1-4 of the Long Term Plan 2018-28 (LTP) for Cornwall Park works, specifically allocated to playground, toilet and duck pond improvements. 

8.2       In addition to this, the proposed Concept Plan includes a further $1,330,000 of actions that was adopted by Council on 20 November 2018 for consultation purposes.  In the adoption of this, it was agreed that the new unbudgeted actions be considered for inclusion in Years 2-5 of the Long Term Plan. 

8.3       Therefore if Council adopts the new additional actions, Officers will make a submission to the 2019/20 Annual Plan for the proposed budget inclusions for Year 2, which will be considered against other Council priorities at that time.   This action will similarly need to occur in subsequent Annual Plan processes to fund the additional works. 


 

 


EXISTING CORNWALL PARK BUDGET 2018-28 LONG TERM PLAN

Description

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

TOTAL

Playground Stage 1

$495,000

$495,000

 

 

 

 

Toilet

 

$170,000

 

 

 

 

Duck Pond and Stream

 

 

 

$385,000

 

 

TOTAL BUDGETED

$495,000

$665,000

 

$385,000

 

$1,545,000

PROPOSED UNBUDGETED ITEMS

Description

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

TOTAL

Grass Embankments

 

 

 

$20,000

 

 

Osmanthus Viewing

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

Pathway Lighting

 

 

 

$5,000

 

 

Tree Uplighting

 

 

 

 

$50,000

 

Playground Stage 2

 

$500,000

 

 

 

 

Event Seating

 

 

 

 

$10,000

 

Playground Shade

 

$100,000

 

 

 

 

Cricket Walkway

 

 

 

$100,000

 

 

Rose Garden Walkway

 

 

 

$40,000

 

 

Duck Pond Walkway

 

 

 

$65,000

 

 

Fountain Walkway

 

$90,000

 

 

 

 

Stream/Lake Viewing

 

 

 

 

$100,000

 

Aviary Enhancements

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

TOTAL UNBUDGETED

 

$690,000

 

$330,000

$310,000

$1,330,000

Table 3: Proposed Budget for Cornwall Park Concept Plan

 

8.4       The following additional capital expenditure in Table 4 has been requested and recommended by Officers in the submissions:

 

PROPOSED ADDITIONAL UNBUDGETED CAPEX FROM SUBMISSIONS

Description

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

TOTAL

Tree Labels

 

 

$5,000

 

 

 

Furniture/Play Features from Redwood Tree

 

 

$25,000

 

 

 

Exercise Equipment

 

 

 

 

$50,000

 

TOTAL ADDITIONAL UNBUDGETED

 

 

$30,000

 

$50,000

$80,000

Table 4: Proposed Additional Capex for Cornwall Park 

 

8.5       As a result of submissions made, the programmed capital expenditure remains unchanged, however if all submissions requesting additional facilities are allowed, this will increase the un-programmed capital expenditure by $1,330,000 plus $80,000 over the current Long Term Plan period. 

8.6       In addition, the following additional operational expenditure in Table 5 has been requested by submissions:

 

PROPOSED ADDITIONAL OPEX FROM SUBMISSIONS

Description

Annual Cost

Full Time Custodian

$78,000

Increase Playground/Furniture

$10,000

Pond/Stream Maintenance

$10,000

TOTAL ADDITIONAL OPEX

$98,000

Table 5: Proposed Additional Opex for Cornwall Park 

 

8.7       The allocation of funds to action this expenditure has been included in the forward budget for the Parks Asset Team, and will be subject to the 19/20 Annual Plan and subsequent LTP processes. Adopting the Action Plan, including the additional desired items will indicate acceptance of this expenditure and work commitment, when being considered and weighed against other competing priorities.  

 

 


 

9.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Parks Planning and Development Manager titled Consideration of Submissions on Draft Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan dated 12/03/2019 be received.

B)        That Council adopt the Cornwall Park Reserve Management Plan, as amended by submissions; and that the allocation of funds required to complete the un-programmed capital works programme identified in the Action Plan form part of the 2019/20 Annual Plan priority considerations; and Draft 2021/31 Long Term Plan.

REMEDY 1: SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION

C)        That the submission of Hugh McBain (Submission 40) requesting that the history section be amended be allowed in part insofar as Page 6 ‘History of Cornwall Park’ be amended by deleting the words shown as struck out and adding the words shown in red italics as follows:

James Nelson Williams (1837–1915) was one of the so-called “apostles” who in 1864 leased twelve smaller blocks within the 19,385 acre (7,844ha) Heretaunga Plains Block.  James purchased his two blocks in 1870, calling his new estate Frimley. As Hastings was not a government-planned town it relied on the generosity of private landowners to donate land for public uses, such as schools and recreation areas.   

In December 1898, it was announced in the Hastings Standard that J N Williams (1837-1915) had “presented the Borough with a public park” from recorded proceedings at a Hastings Borough Council meeting.

The Hastings Borough Council minutes record this in December 1898:

“That this Council of behalf of the residents of Hastings accent Mr J N Williams a hearty vote of thanks for his magnificent gift of a piece of land to the Borough for the purpose of a Park and recreation grounds”

However, in what appears to be pencil and in different handwriting, a sentence was later added to the above minute after “Mr J N Williams”: “as representing the transferring of the property”.

This likely explains the reason why Archdeacon Samuel Williams’s (1822-1907) daughters, Mrs Lucy Warren and Miss Lydia Williams, donated Cornwall Park to the people of Hastings in 1901 (Samuel was J N Williams brother-in-law) -  J N Williams did not own the land, but was “representing” his brother-in-law, Samuel, who it appears did not want any publicity.

Samuel worked closely with his brother-in-law J N Williams, whose name appears on legal documentation connected with Cornwall Park.

At the opening of Cornwall Park in November 1905, Hastings mayor, W Y Dennett, stated:

“The park was a family gift of the Williams’, and although Mr J N Williams did not personally give the land, it was through his instrumentality that it was given to the people of Hastings.”

On 21 December 1898, James – who was a Councillor – announced at a Hastings Borough Council meeting he was gifting 20 acres (8ha) of his Frimley Estate as a Public Park. The area fronted Tomoana Road, and the Ruahapia creek ran through the property. The land was accepted with a vote of thanks by the Council.

A deed covering the gift of the Park from James Nelson Williams to the Hastings Borough Council was drafted in March 1900, setting out the conditions attached to the plantings in the Park.  Thomas Horton, who owned a nursery in Pahiatua (and later Hastings), supplied trees and hedges free of charge for preliminary plantings at the Park. Most of them were deciduous and were planted around the boundary. 

 

D)        That the submission of Linda Bruce (Submission 41) requesting that the Goals and Actions be amended to refer contemporary social and cultural wellbeing be allowed and the Plan be updated as follows:

Amend Part 2 Social & Cultural Values by adding the following new section identified below in red italics:

Improve Contemporary Social and Cultural Wellbeing

Through innovative planning and design achieve a sympathetic balance of the retention of historic features and new developments guided by bi cultural philosophy and contemporary aesthetics to ensure public spaces reflect our diverse community and are relevant to the needs of today’s young and future generations.

REMEDY 2: SECTION 1.2 ORGANISED SPORT

E)        That the submission of Pam Ogilve (Submission 9) requesting removal of the embankments be disallowed, and the submission of Sally Coop (Submission 14) supporting the embankments be allowed insofar as Policy 1.2.7 is retained in the Plan.

F)        That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) be allowed insofar as there is no allocation of Council funds towards the relocation of the practice nets.

REMEDY 3: SECTION 1.3 DOGS

G)        That the submission of Catherine Scott (Submission 5) and Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) be allowed insofar as Policy 1.3.2 requiring dogs to be on leads at all times in Cornwall Park be retained and that improved signs be erected.

REMEDY 4: SECTION 2.2 BUILDINGS

H)        That the submissions of Laura Hocquard (Submission 15), Wayne Taylor (Submission 16), Helen Whittaker (Submission 24), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) be allowed in part insofar as improvements will commence next financial year.

I)          That the submission of Wayne Taylor (Submission 16) requesting consideration be given to modifying the bird aviary to allow the public to walk through and interact with the birds be disallowed in part insofar as Officers will consider the potential for open days to enhance the potential educational benefits of the aviary

J)        That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) requesting that only maintenance be spent on the bird aviary be disallowed in part insofar as only existing maintenance and renewal funds be spent initially.

K)        That the submission of Heritage New Zealand (Submission 52) requesting that Policy 2.2.7 be amended be allowed insofar as Policy 2.2.7 be amended as follows, by adding the words shown in red italics:

2.2.7    Keep the use and condition of buildings on the Park under review to ensure they meet the needs of park users and the community and remain relevant to the Park.  Where buildings are no longer well utilised, an alternative compatible community use will be found, or the building may be removed.

REMEDY 5: SECTION 2.3 FENCES AND WALLS

L)        That the submissions of Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) requesting the reinstatement of the plaque be allowed insofar as Policy 2.3.4 is retained in the Plan.

M)       That the submission of Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) requesting the retention of the historic walls and seats; and measures to keep vehicles out of the park be allowed insofar as a new Policy 2.3.6 be added to the Plan:

2.3.6         Maintain and protect the historic stone walls and seats within the Park for future generations to enjoy

 

REMEDY 6: SECTION 2.4 LIGHTING

N)        That the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 14) supporting the policy to provide additional lighting around the pathways be allowed insofar as the policy is retained, and the submission stating their opposition to the provision of amenity lighting be disallowed insofar as this policy be retained.  

 

REMEDY 7: SECTION 2.5 PLAYGROUNDS

O)        That the submissions of Sally Coop (Submission 12), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Doug Honnor (Submission 33) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) supporting the proposed new playground be allowed.

P)        That the submission of Barbara Mawson (Submission 12), Jude Henderson (Submission 13) and Shannon Tait (Submission 31) supporting the playground design and inclusion of equipment for all ages and abilities, shade and furniture be allowed.

Q)        That the submission of Alison Francis (Submission 8) requesting that cycle parking is included in the design be allowed.

R)        That the submissions of Grant Burney (Submission 2), Catherine Scott (Submission 5) and Graeme Mill (Submission 7) and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) supporting the playground and requesting additional features features for teenagers and adults, including adult fitness equipment and swings and junior swings be allowed in part insofar as adult and junior swings are included in the Plan, and provision be made for the inclusion of adult fitness equipment, and that officers will work with local health providers and community groups to seek partnerships for the provision of these and community BBQ.

S)        That the submissions of Nichola Dickinson (Submission 44) and James Dickinson (Submission 45) requesting that the playground equipment that is being replaced be relocated to Tamatea Street Reserve be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as the Cornwall Park playground equipment is not relocated; but that Officers will consult with the community for the provision of a new modest playground in the Mahora area next financial year.

T)        That the submission of Linda Bruce (Submission 41) requesting the inclusion of reference to free play be allowed and Page 24 ‘Recreation and Leisure’ be amended to add the following shown in red italics:

·        Recognise and provide for the provision of play experiences throughout the Park to encourage adventure, exploratory, discovery and free play.

U)        That the submission of Patricia Reddy (Submission 55) regarding the removal of one tree for the playground be disallowed insofar as the Concept Plan remains unchanged, but allowed in part insofar as the following be added to Page 18 of the Plan:

Children’s Playground

In order to make optimal use of the existing site, and improve accessibility and integration with the former tea kiosk building the Plan proposes the removal of the redwood tree.  This is not a protected tree and has recently been assessed as showing signs of decline in some of its branches.  Council will retain the timber from the tree to be used to build something that can be later reinstated back into the playground where it can be enjoyed by future generations, such as in the free play area, furniture, artwork or other natural playground equipment in consultation with mana whenua, local artists and community groups.    

 

REMEDY 8: SECTION 2.8 SIGNS

V)        That the submission of Alison McMinn (Submission 38) requesting the provision of display boards identifying the significance of the rubble seats and walls be allowed insofar as the two large information boards already identify the history of these features, however if new signs are created, more information will be provided on their significance.

REMEDY 9: SECTION 2.9 PARK FURNITURE

W)       That the submission of Catherine Scott (Submission 5) requesting dog drinking bowls be allowed insofar as drinking fountains will be included in the concept plan with dog drinking attachments.

REMEDY 10: SECTION 2.10 VEHICLE PARKING

X)        That the submission of Doug Honnor (Submission 33) and Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) supporting the provision of angle parking be disallowed insofar as Policy 2.10.4 be amended as follows by deleting the words shown as struck out and adding the words shown in red italics:

2.10.4    Formalise marked angle parallel parking spaces along Cornwall Road and Roberts Street with road markings to ensure optimal use of the space and identification of pedestrian accessways. Only consider the provision of marked angle parking in the future if required to meet additional demand in the future, and if health and safety risks can be addressed through improved road design.

 

Y)        That the submission of Peter McNab (Submission 50) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) opposing the provision of angle parking be allowed insofar as Policy 2.10.4 be amended as identified above.

Z)        That the submission of Doug Honnor (Submission 33) requesting the removal of the dish channels along Robert Street be disallowed.

 

 

 

REMEDY 11: SECTION 2.12 PATHWAY NETWORKS

AA)     That the submissions of Sally Coop (Submission 14), Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) and Barbara Mawson (Submission 12) supporting the proposed new pathways within the park and requesting that the pathway improvements be included as a higher priority in the Action Plan and that there is no damage to tree roots be allowed in part insofar as the creation of new pathways are currently scheduled for 2021/22; but that improvements to the safety of existing pathways will be undertaken within existing forward renewal programme and that arborists will be involved in the development of any new pathways to ensure there is no impact on the health of the trees.

REMEDY 12: SECTION 3.1 TREES AND GARDENS

BB)     That the submission of Catherine Scott (Submission 5) requesting that more trees be labelled, and a living wall be included in the plan be allowed in part insofar as a new policy be added to Section 3.1 and Section 6.0 of the Plan as follows:

3.1.9      Provide labels to identify all significant and outstanding trees within the Park for education and information purposes.

6.0         Action List and Timeframes

 

NO.

POLICY

ACTION

SHORT TERM

14

3.1

Label all significant and outstanding trees within the Park

 

 

CC)     That the submission of Alison Francis (Submission 8) supporting the succession and management plan for Cornwall Park trees be allowed insofar as these provisions are retained in the Plan.

DD)     That the submission of Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) requesting that the native garden be beautified with native planting to provide food and shelter to wildlife and that the character of the Osmanthus Garden is not compromised by plant removal for security be allowed insofar as Policy 3.1.7 is retained in the Plan; and that a new Policy 3.1.9 be added to the Plan as shown in red italics below:

3.1.9    Consult the Friends of Cornwall Park in the preparation and implementation of any significant planting or shrub removal plans outside of any general maintenance or renewal work programmes, particularly in the Native Area and Osmanthus Gardens, taking into account both the safety of park users, as well as the amenity and habitat benefits of these areas.

REMEDY 13: SECTION 3.1 WATER

EE)     That the submission of David Renouf (Submission 1) relating to the improvement of water quality in the duck pond and stream in Cornwall Park be allowed in part insofar as water quality of the stream and ponds in the park is a priority of this Plan.

FF)      That the submissions of Sally Coop (Submission 14), Helen Whittaker (Submission 24), Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) supporting the provision included in the Plan relating to water; and requesting regular maintenance and additional planting for wildlife be allowed insofar as this is now included as part of the contract with Recreation Services and being regularly monitored.

REMEDY 14: SECTION 3.3 PLANT AND ANIMAL PESTS

GG)     That the submission of Grant Burney (Submission 2) requesting the control of weeds and prickles around the children’s playground be allowed and that the control of Onehunga Weed will be extended to this area as part of the spring sportsfield renovation programme.

REMEDY 15: SECTION 4.1 CULTURE AND HERITAGE

HH)     That the submission of Heritage New Zealand (Submission 52) requesting amendments to Section 4.1 relating to Culture and Heritage be allowed insofar as the Plan is amended to delete the words shown as struck out and add the words shown in red italics:

Amend Page 4 (Legislation) to include the following section:

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014

The Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 replaced the Historic Places Act 1993 on 20 May 2014.  As stated on the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga website, the new legislation reforms the governance of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust in line with its status as a Crown entity and streamlines many procedures under the Act. For example, the new archaeological provisions are intended to improve efficiency, reduce costs, and improve alignment with the Resource Management Act 1991. 

 

As owners of heritage places (such as buildings, parks, reserves, infrastructure, and archaeological sites), local authorities must meet relevant statutory requirements and comply with plan rules for land they own and administer.  Local authorities can set a good example for heritage management in the district or region (and to the wider community) by ensuring that their own assets have been researched and evaluated for their heritage values, and are managed in accordance with conservation principles.

Amend Page 16 as follows:

King George V Coronation Drinking Fountain

The Coronation Fountain Lions Monument has a Category II New Zealand Historic Places Trust classification. The King George V Coronation Drinking Fountain is on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero as a Historic Place Category 2 (List Number 1078).  The fountain was constructed in 1911 to mark the coronation of King George V.

Amend Page 18 ‘Historical and Cultural Values’ as follows:

 

As an important community and sporting attraction, the Park must be managed in a way that is sensitive to changing user demands and expectations, whilst still retaining and protecting those heritage features that contribute to its unique character.

Amend Section 2.12 to add the following paragraph:

A new pathway is proposed to recognise and enhance the accessibility and importance of the Coronation Fountain within its surroundings.  The extent of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga List entry for the Coronation Fountain includes a 2 metre curtilage from the platform’s edge and in all direction.  Proposals near the Fountain will require careful planning and implementation in order to appropriately relate to the Coronation Fountain, including the curtilage and wider setting.  Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga will be consulted on this matter.

Amend Section 4.1 Cultural & Heritage Significance as follows:

 

A number of parks within the District contain sites of heritage significance, such as buildings, landscapes, structures, archaeological sites and trees. Many of these are listed in the Historic Places Trust Register, and include registered historic places, historic areas, registered Waahi Tapu sites and recorded archaeological sites. Trees of outstanding heritage values are also identified under the Notable Trees Registration Scheme. Many of these heritage resources have protection under the Historic Places Act New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero, or the District Plan. 

There are a number of sites of historic heritage within Cornwall Park, including 13 Outstanding Trees as identified in the Hastings District Plan; the Coronation Fountain which has a Category II registration under the Historic Places Trust (No.1078); the King George V Coronation Drinking Fountain is on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero as a Historic Place Category 2 (List Number 1078),  as well as historic stone bridges over the waterways and stone seats and walls throughout the park made of earthquake rubble in the 1930s. 

Amend Policy 4.1 by deleting the incorrect policies 5.1.1 – 5.1.4 and replacing with the following:

Objective

4.1.1    To identify, maintain and protect any historic sites and features of special community interest so as to preserve and enrich public awareness of our heritage.  

Policy

4.1.2    To ensure the protection and preservation of all historic and cultural features, and where appropriate display information as to their significance.

 

REMEDY 16: SECTION 5.1 MAINTENANCE

II)         That the submissions of Alison McMinn (Submission 38), Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39), Elizabeth Carr (Submission 42) and Patricia Reddy (Submission 55) requesting the improvement of maintenance in the Park and that a full time staff member be appointed to this Park be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as Section 5.1 of the Plan is amended by deleting those words shown as struck out and adding those words shown in red italics as follows:

5.1         MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

The management and operation of the Park has been undertaken collectively between the Parks Asset Management Team and the Maintenance Group (Parks Service Delivery Unit).  From February 2019 the maintenance of all the District’s parks, reserves and open spaces, including Cornwall Park will be is contracted by Council to undertaken by Recreational Services. an external contractor to CouncilThe contract includes mowing, sportsground preparation, toilet cleaning, and playground, gardens and tree maintenance to specified Levels of Service; and takes The management of the park must take into account the objectives and policies of this Plan and the agreed service levels.  These service levels will be reviewed on an annual basis to recognise the importance of Cornwall Park as the premier park of the District; and as new facilities are added to the park or increased levels of service are agreed, these will increase annual operating costs.

 

REMEDY 17: SECTION 5.3 LEASES

JJ)      That the submissions of Grant Burney (Submission 2), Helen Curran (Submission 3), Alison Francis (Submission 8), Emily Davenport (Submission 20) and Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) supporting the use of the former tea kiosk for community use; and the submissions of Elliot Pritchard (Submission 6), Ministry of Education (Submission 11), Susy Ratcliffe (Submission 17), Oliver Styles (Submission 18), Annabel Beattie (Submission 19),  Connie Moroney (Submission 21), Janka McBeth (Submission 22), Pia Bradshaw (Submission 23), Hallie Barclay (Submission 25), Angel Clarke (Submission 26), Vicki Hope (Submission 28), Michelle Hutton (Submission 29), Frances Martin (Submission 30), Nicola Marett (Submission 32), Cornwall Park Playcentre (Submission 34), Tony McBride (Submission 35), Rebecca Hill (Submission 36), Hana Ruth (Submission 37), Jenny Epplett (Submission 43), Amy Hutchinson (Submission 46), New Zealand Playcentre Federation (Lower North Island Region) (Submission 47), Ashridge Road Playcentre (Submission 48), Amy Hopkinson-Styles (Submission 49),  Ruth Vincent (Submission 51), Genevieve and Simon Renall (Submission 53), Margaret McBride (Submission 56) and Alice Corkran (Submission 57) requesting the renewal of the lease of the former tea kiosk building to Cornwall Park Playcentre; and the submission of John Ruth (Submission 27) opposing the use of the former tea kiosk building as a café due to health and safety reasons and support of the continued use of it by Playcentre; and the submission of Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) requesting that the Playcentre be offered a short term lease while discussions take place be allowed and disallowed in part insofar as the Plan is amended by deleting the words shown as struck out and adding the words shown in red italics:

 

Pg. 9:    Issues & Opportunities

              Former Tea Kiosk Building

 

…… Council will consider the future use alternative uses of the former tea kiosk building at the expiration of the current an extended lease to Cornwall Park Playcentre that may facilitate will consider the optimal use of the building to meet the needs of the wider community, while taking into account the long association of Cornwall Park Playcentre with the park and the benefits they provide to the community.use and enjoyment

 

2.2         Buildings

 

The former tea kiosk building overlooking the Cricket Green is owned by Council. The Cornwall Park Playcentre lease to occupy the former tea kiosk building expires in 2019.  The lease provides them with the exclusive use of the building and an adjacent 350m2 of open space. 

 

While Council recognises the long history that Playcentre has with this building, its use does not meet the primary purpose of a Recreation Reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.  A playcentre should be located on a Local Purpose Reserve.  Following a decision on the long term use of the building, Council may need to apply to the Minister of Conservation to change the classification to reflect the approved use.

 

2.2.17    Consider the future use of and/or extension to the former tea kiosk building in accordance with requirements of the Reserves Act 1977, a desire to obtain maximum community benefits from this historic building, while recognising the long association that Playcentre has with the park, and the community benefit they provide through children’s play and development.

 

5.3         Leases, Licences and Permits

 

The Hawkes Bay Playcentre Association has a 12 year lease to occupy the former tea kiosk building for use as Cornwall Park Playcentre, expiring in 2019.  Council recognises the long association that the playcentre has with Cornwall Park, and their desire to continue to occupy the building, and their association with the park.  At the expiry of their current lease in 2019, Council will provide a one year extension, and during this time work with them and New Zealand Playcentre Federation to investigate the feasibility, including financial implications of (a) building a purpose built playcentre or community facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute. consider other alternative uses of the building to maximise public use such as shelter, community meeting or function rooms or café, and work with the Cornwall Park Playcentre to facilitate their relocation to an alternative park if a decision is made not to renew their lease.

 

5.3.8      Consider alternative uses of the former tea kiosk building that may facilitate wider community use and enjoyment of the Park prior to the renewal of a lease to Hawke’s Bay Playcentre Association. Extend the existing lease with the Cornwall Park Playcentre to occupy the former tea kiosk building for a further period of one year from 10 September 2019.  

 

5.3.9      Investigate the feasibility, including financial implications of (a) building a purpose built playcentre or community facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute; and report back to Council prior to the expiry of the extended lease on 10 September 2020.

6.0         Action List & Timeframes

 

16.         Consider the restoration and alternative uses of the former tea kiosk building to maximise public use such as shelter, meeting rooms or café, and work with the Cornwall Park playcentre to facilitate their relocation to an alternative site such as Duke Street Reserve. Investigate the feasibility, including financial implications of (a) building a purpose built playcentre or community facility adjacent to the existing building at Cornwall Park and the practicality of shared community use of the existing building; and (b) the costs of restoring the building back to its original condition and upgrade for community use; and potential investment partners, sponsors and community funds to contribute; and report back to Council prior to the expiry of the extended lease on 10 September 2020.

 

REMEDY 18: SECTION 5.5 NETWORK UTILITIES

KK)     That the submission of Powerco (Submission 10) be allowed insofar as Section 5.5 remains in the Plan unchanged. 

REMEDY 19: SECTION 5.9 RESERVE BOUNDARIES

LL)      That the submissions of Friends of Cornwall Park (Submission 39) and Bruce and Val Noell (Submission 54) regarding the maintenance of the area behind Eversley Rest Home be allowed in part insofar as the landscaping will form part of the regular maintenance of the Park, but that Officers will work with residents regarding other beautification such as murals on the wall of the maintenance shed.

With the reasons for this decision being that the objective of the decision will contribute to meeting the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost-effective for households and business by:

i)          The provision of good quality recreation open spaces and facilities.

 

 

Attachments:

 

Attachment 1 Summary of Submissions

CFM-17-8-10-19-106

 

Submission No. 1 - David Renouf

CFM-17-8-10-19-50

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 2 - Grant Burney

CFM-17-8-10-19-51

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 3 - Helen Curran

CFM-17-8-10-19-52

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 4 - Jessica Franklin

CFM-17-8-10-19-53

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 5 - Catherine Scott

CFM-17-8-10-19-54

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 6 - Elliott Estlin Prichard

CFM-17-8-10-19-55

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 7 - Graeme Mill

CFM-17-8-10-19-60

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 8 - Alison Francis

CFM-17-8-10-19-61

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 9 - Pam Ogilvie

CFM-17-8-10-19-62

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 10 - Powerco

CFM-17-8-10-19-63

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 11 - Ministry of Education

CFM-17-8-10-19-64

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 12 - Barbara Mawson

CFM-17-8-10-19-67

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 13 - Jude Henderson

CFM-17-8-10-19-68

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 14 - Sally Coop

CFM-17-8-10-19-69

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 15 - Laura Hocquard

CFM-17-8-10-19-70

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 16 - Wayne Taylor

CFM-17-8-10-19-71

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 17 - Susy Ratcliffe

CFM-17-8-10-19-73

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 18 - Oliver Styles - Redacted

CFM-17-8-10-19-108

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 19 - Annabelle Beattie

CFM-17-8-10-19-82

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 20 - Emily Davenport

CFM-17-8-10-19-83

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 21 - Connie Moroney

CFM-17-8-10-19-88

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 22 - Janka McBeth

CFM-17-8-10-19-90

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 23 - Pia Bradshaw

CFM-17-8-10-19-92

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 24 - Helen Whittaker

CFM-17-8-10-19-93

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 25 - Hallie Barclay

CFM-17-8-10-19-94

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 26 - Angel Clarke

CFM-17-8-10-19-95

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 27 - John Ruth

CFM-17-8-10-19-97

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 28 - Vicki Hope

CFM-17-8-10-19-101

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 29 - Michelle Hutton

CFM-17-8-10-19-103

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 30 - Frances Martin

CFM-17-8-10-19-104

Vol 1 of 2

Submission No. 31 - Shanon Tait

CFM-17-8-10-19-56

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 32 - Nicola Marrett

CFM-17-8-10-19-57

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 33 - Doug Honnor

CFM-17-8-10-19-58

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 34 - Cornwall Park Playcentre

CFM-17-8-10-19-59

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 35 - Tony McBride

CFM-17-8-10-19-65

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 36 - Rebecca Hill

CFM-17-8-10-19-66

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 37 - Hana Ruth

CFM-17-8-10-19-72

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 38 - Alison McMinn

CFM-17-8-10-19-74

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 39 - Friends of Cornwall Park

CFM-17-8-10-19-75

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 40 - Hugh McBain

CFM-17-8-10-19-77

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 41 - Linda Bruce

CFM-17-8-10-19-78

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 42 - Elizabeth Carr

CFM-17-8-10-19-79

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 43 - Jenny Epplett

CFM-17-8-10-19-80

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 44 - Nichola Dickinson

CFM-17-8-10-19-81

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 45 - James Dickinson

CFM-17-8-10-19-84

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 46 - Amy Hutchinson

CFM-17-8-10-19-85

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 47 - New Zealand Playcentre Federation

CFM-17-8-10-19-86

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 48 - Ashridge Road Playcentre

CFM-17-8-10-19-87

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 49 - Amy Hopkinson-Styles

CFM-17-8-10-19-89

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 50 - Peter McNab

CFM-17-8-10-19-91

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 51 - Ruth Vincent

CFM-17-8-10-19-96

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 52 - Heritage New Zealand

CFM-17-8-10-19-98

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 53 - Genevieve and Simon Renall

CFM-17-8-10-19-99

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 54 - Bruce and Val Noell

CFM-17-8-10-19-100

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 55 - Patricia Reddy

CFM-17-8-10-19-105

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 56 - Margaret McBride

CFM-17-8-10-19-107

Vol 2 of 2

Submission No. 57 - Alice Corkan

CFM-17-8-10-19-109

Vol 2 of 2

 

 

 


Summary of Submissions

Attachment 1

 

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