Description: COAT-ARM Hastings District Council

 

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East, Hastings

Phone:  (06) 871 5000

Fax:  (06) 871 5100

WWW.hastingsdc.govt.nz

 

 

 

Open

 

A G E N D A

 

 

Community Development Committee MEETING

 

 

Meeting Date:

Tuesday, 9 April 2019

Time:

1.00pm

Venue:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East

Hastings

 

Committee Members

Chair: Councillor Dixon

Mayor Hazlehurst

Councillors Barber, Harvey  (Deputy Chair), Heaps, Lawson, Lyons, Kerr, Nixon, O’Keefe, Poulain, Redstone, Schollum, Travers and Watkins

Tangata Whenua Appointee: Evelyn Ratima

(Quorum = 8)

Officer Responsible

Group Manager: Economic Growth & Organisation Improvement and Group Manager: Community Facilities & Programmes

Committee Secretary

Carolyn Hunt (Ext 5634)

 


Community Development  Committee – Terms of Reference

 

Fields of Activity

The development of policy and the oversight of operations in the area of the social, economic, cultural and environmental wellbeing and development of the District, including (but not limited to) the following activities:

Economic Development

·         Development of the Council’s overarching strategies for Environmental Management, Economic Development, Growth Management and Urban Development;

·         District development and land use planning (high level strategy)

·         Urban design and development (including CBD planning)

·         Hastings City Centre Development

·         Landmarks Activities

·         Parks and Reserves

·         Economic & Business Development programmes

·         Regional development

 

Social Development

·         Development of the Council’s overarching strategies for Social and Cultural activities

·         Housing for the elderly

·         Cemeteries (including physical works)

·         Youth

·         Arts, Culture and Heritage including the Hastings City Art Gallery

·         Democracy, civil society, community engagement and partnership

·         Social Development and wellbeing programmes

·         Guilin Sister City Relationship

·         Local and community events and celebrations

·         Historic commemorations

·         Citizenship activities

·         Civic Honours Awards

·         Grants, Funding and allocations

·         Library operations

·         Hawkes Bay Opera House

·         Recreation Facilities other than Parks & Reserves

·         Recreation activities

 

Other roles of a strategic overview nature including:

·         Other policy development not otherwise provided for

Membership (Mayor and 14 Councillors)

Chairman appointed by Council

Deputy Chairman appointed by Council

The Mayor

All other Councillors

 

Quorum – 8 members

 

DELEGATED POWERS:

General Delegations

1.       Authority to exercise all of Council powers, functions and authorities (except where prohibited by law or otherwise delegated to another committee) in relation to all matters detailed in the Fields of Activity.

2.       Authority to re-allocate funding already approved by the Council as part of the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan process, for matters within the Fields of Activity provided that the re-allocation of funds does not increase the overall amount of money committed to the Fields of Activity in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan.

3.       Authority to develop and adopt goals, strategies and policies on behalf of the Council for matters within the Fields of Activity.  

4.       Responsibility to monitor Long Term Plan/Annual Plan implementation within the Fields of Activity set out above.

5.       Authority to re-allocate funding already approved by the Council as part of the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan process, for matters within the Fields of Activity provided that the re-allocation of funds does not increase the overall amount of money committed to the Fields of Activity in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan.

6.       Authority to develop and adopt goals, strategies and policies on behalf of the Council for matters within the Fields of Activity.  

7.       Responsibility to monitor Long Term Plan/Annual Plan implementation within the Fields of Activity set out above.

Cemeteries

8        Authority to exercise all of the Council’s powers, functions, and duties under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and any other statute or regulation relating to the control and management of the burial or cremation of the dead within Hastings District (other than the review of bylaws, which is the responsibility of the Strategy Planning and Partnerships Committee).

 

Parks, Reserves and Walkways

 

9.       Authority to exercise all of the Council’s powers and functions under the Reserves Act 1977 in respect of parks and reserves other than the review of bylaws.

10.     Authority to hear submissions under s120 (1)(c) of the Reserves Act 1977 in relation to all reserves or to appoint a commissioner or commissioners to hear submissions and to make a recommendation in respect of those objections or submissions to the Committee.

11.     Authority to determine names for or to change the name of, parks and reserves owned or administered by the Council.

12.     Where the Council is appointed as the controlling authority of a walkway under the New Zealand Walkways Act 1990, authority to exercise the powers of the controlling authority.

 

Bylaws

 

13.     Authority to monitor any Council bylaws relating to matters within the Fields of Activity and to recommend any amendments or additions to those bylaws to the Strategy Planning and Partnerships Committee for review and consideration.


 

HASTINGS DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

Community Development Committee MEETING

 

Tuesday, 9 April 2019

 

VENUE:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor

Civic Administration Building

Lyndon Road East

Hastings

TIME:

1.00pm

 

A G E N D A

 

 

 

1.         Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

2.         Conflict of Interest

Members need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a Member of the Council and any private or other external interest they might have.  This note is provided as a reminder to Members to scan the agenda and assess their own private interests and identify where they may have a pecuniary or other conflict of interest, or where there may be perceptions of conflict of interest. 

If a Member feels they do have a conflict of interest, they should publicly declare that at the start of the relevant item of business and withdraw from participating in the meeting.  If a Member thinks they may have a conflict of interest, they can seek advice from the General Counsel or the Democratic Support Manager (preferably before the meeting). 

It is noted that while Members can seek advice and discuss these matters, the final decision as to whether a conflict exists rests with the member.

3.         Confirmation of Minutes

Minutes of the Community Development Committee Meeting held Tuesday 26 February 2019.

(Previously circulated)

4.         Presentation - Draft Regional Public Transport Plan                                        7

5.         Libraries update                                                                                                          9

6.         Emergency Management update                                                                         11

7.         Pools Update                                                                                                             15

8.         Safer Hastings Coalition Update                                                                          21

9.         Splash Planet Update                                                                                              63

10.       Hastings District Youth Council 2019                                                                 67

11.       Additional Business Items

12.       Extraordinary Business Items 

 

 

     


File Ref: 19/341

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Group Manager: Asset Management

Craig Thew

SUBJECT:                    Presentation - Draft Regional Public Transport Plan        

 

 

 

1.0       INTRODUCTION

1.1       The purpose of this report is to inform the Committee that Anne Redgrave, Transport Manager for the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council will present the draft Regional Public Transport Plan.

1.2       The Plan would be released for public consultation on 5 April 2019.

1.3       The presentation to the Committee is to highlight key points, seek feedback and encourage submissions.

 

2.0       RECOMMENDATION

            That the report of the Group Manager” Asset Management titled “Presentation – Draft Regional Public Transport Plan” dated 9 April 2019 be received..

 

 

Attachments:

 

1

Draft Regional Public Transport Plan

CG-14-73-00068

Separate Doc

 

 

 


File Ref: 19/287

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries

Paula Murdoch

SUBJECT:                    Libraries update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       This reports contributes to the achievement of the Council’s community outcomes and specific Council objectives as set out in the Long Term Plan 2018-28 by:

·    Places and spaces for arts, culture and learning

·    Fostering recreational participation

1.2       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee about Libraries activities in recent months.

1.3       This issue arises from Council’s commitment to deliver library services that meet the needs of its diverse communities.

The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       This report concludes by recommending that this report by the Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries be accepted.

2.0       ETHNICITY DATA

2.1       The ability for all new library members registering for a card to indicate their ethnicity was activated in November 2018. This information is optional and numbers choosing to register this information are as yet very low, so this will only be reported back to the Committee once sufficient data are available.

3.0       ARCHIVES

3.1       An assessment is about to begin of the community archives held at the Hastings and Havelock North Libraries.

3.2       At the regional level, discussions are ongoing with the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust and MTG and Napier City Council staff about options for management of the regional collection (including archives).

4.0       BEQUEST

4.1       The full amount bequeathed from Mr Peter Arthur’s estate has now been received by Council, totalling $512,000. Mr Arthur’s will made clear that he was interested in supporting older and visually impaired people. Officers are looking at options including enhancing the level of service to people with these needs through multiuse but senior-friendly spaces, furniture, technology and programmes.

5.0       EVENTS & PROGRAMMES

5.1       A major highlight for fans (and staff) was the Harry Potter Book Night on February 7th, run in conjunction with Hastings City Art Gallery staff and the Hastings City Business Association. With over two thousand attendees on the night, Pottermaniacs were making wands, being sorted into houses, rune making, playing quidditch and hunting for dragon eggs. A replica of Dumbledore’s office was a huge hit as fans celebrated the global phenomenon that is JK Rowing’s Harry Potter series.

5.2       The Summer Sparks and Meh. holiday programmes finished at the end of January, wrapping up six weeks of discovery, creativity and fun for local children and youth. This is the second year that the Libraries have run these locally-grown programmes and community support remains enthusiastic. Staff continue to work to develop programming to reach more youth and better suit customer needs.

5.3       Interest in our library programmes from other public libraries around the country has also been high, with enquiries from a number about the Summer Sparks programme. Summer Sparks has also been on the programme at the national industry forum, so work being done by HDC staff is earning national recognition from peers.

6.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries titled Libraries update dated 9/04/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/288

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries

Paula Murdoch

SUBJECT:                    Emergency Management update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       This reports contributes to the achievement of the Council’s community outcomes and specific Council objectives as set out in the Long Term Plan 2018-28 by resilience to hazards and shocks.

1.2       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee about Emergency Management activities in recent months.

1.3       This issue arises from Council’s commitment to ensuring that it is in a position to manage incidents and emergencies in an effective and coordinated fashion.

The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       This report concludes by recommending the report of the Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries be accepted.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       Emergency Management (EM) within local authorities has undergone change in the last two years, with the transfer of Rural Fire and Hazardous Substances to Fire & Emergency New Zealand (FENZ) in July 2017.

2.2       Since the retirement of the Advisor to the CEO on EM in late 2017, the EM function moved to the Community Facilities & Programmes Group, with a focus on developing internal capability and managing the relationship with Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group (HBCDEMG).

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       Since then, there has been an emphasis on ensuring that the Incident Management Team (IMT) are trained and understand their roles in the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and ready for activation for either a local or a regional incident.

 

 

3.2       A table summarising training undertaken in the current financial year is below:

 

Number of staff

Type of training

11

ITF Intermediate training

11

CIMS 4 (with 11 more booked to go May 2019)

8

EMIS training

9

HBCDEMG exercise

27

Exercise Marara – HDC functional exercise

78

IMT alert testing

18

Temporary EOC/GECC facility familiarisation

34

CIMS function familiarisation sessions

 

3.3       In February 2019, Exercise Marara (a functional exercise) was run with HBCDEMG support to test activation and assess processes in a local weather event requiring a Council response.

3.4       The second session of Exercise Marara has now been cancelled twice, owing to resourcing issues with staff being unavailable relative to their business as usual roles. This is concerning and limits staff being able to prepare and be operationally ready for an actual incident or emergency.

3.5       Other local authorities in the region have run or are planning similar exercises and smaller scale desktop exercises will be held during the year and larger scale exercises are planned by HBCDEMG as part of the National Exercise Programme.

3.6       In addition, the IMT has been activated or partially activated to respond to or monitor the following actual events:

·    September 2018 – Heavy rain watch

·    December 2018 – Landfill situation

·    January 2019 – Recycling situation

·    January 2019 – Cape Kidnappers landslide

3.7       These activations indicate that the IMT is often activated to respond to incidents that extend well beyond weather or other natural hazard events. The IMT has been convened on several occasions when resources or capacity within a business as usual (BAU) team has been exceeded and a coordinated response is required.

4.0       EMO FACILITY & STAFF

4.1       Staff find the temporary relocation of HBCDEMG staff to the second floor of Heretaunga House is working well and is convenient for easy liaison between the two agencies.

4.2       HBCDEMG staff relocate back to the new EMO Building after handover from contractors in July and Council staff will continue to optimise operational readiness of staff, equipment and the facility, as well as managing the relationship with Group and other agencies.

5.0       OPTIONS

5.1       There are no options presented as this report does not require a decision.

6.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Manager, Emergency Readiness & Response and Libraries titled Emergency Management update dated 9/04/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/301

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Community Facilities Manager

Wendy Beeke

SUBJECT:                    Pools Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       This report contributes to the achievement of the Council’s community outcomes and specific Council objectives as set out in the Long Term Plan 2018-28 by:

·    Places and spaces for recreation

·    Fostering recreational participation

1.2       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee on Village and Frimley the Pools 2018/19 summer season and an overview of activities and Clive and Flaxmere indoor pools.

1.3       This report arises from a request by Councillors to receive annual updates on the pools and activities.

1.3    The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       This report addresses the operation of the pools in terms of the provision of a local public service and the associated infrastructure that is required to meet the needs and aspirations of the local community for aquatic facilities.

1.5       This report concludes by recommending that the report from the Community Facilities Manager, titled “Pools Update” dated 9th April be received.

2.0       CURRENT SITUATION

2.1       Usage Indoor Pools

2.2       Learn to Swim (LTS) continues to be hugely successful at both Flaxmere Aquatics and Clive War Memorial Pool with many children across the district benefiting from the programmes. 

2.3       Learn to Swim classes take centre stage in the weekday afternoons and Saturday mornings providing students from 6 months of age to adulthood important lifelong water skills.

2.4       Flaxmere Aquatics receives $25,000 from the Flaxmere Licensing Trust to deliver learn to swim programmes at a subsidised cost to Flaxmere Primary Schools.

2.5       Other schools also participate (user pays) where in the 2018 calendar year Council delivered 1440 lessons that involved children 2483 from 10 schools in the district. 

2.6       Another popular activity at both facilities is the Aqua Aerobics held mornings and afternoons, putting people through their paces to upbeat music and routines.  

2.7       These two facilities are utilised to full capacity by public and clubs alike.  Swim Clubs and Canoe Polo use the pool throughout the week capitalising on the general early opening time of 6am and exclusive between 8pm and 10pm where the pool is closed to the public.

2.8       In addition to the swimming clubs and programmed activity (Aqua Aerobics) there are dedicated lanes for lap swimming, play and also the option of hiring space for the fun inflatable and birthday parties.

 

 

Clive War Memorial Pool

Flaxmere Aquatics

Number of competitive swim clubs

 

x2         Trojans

             Greendale

    

X1     Heretaunga Sun   

         Devils

Number of clubs

 

x3       Ocean Beach Surf 

           Waimarama Surf

           Hawkes Bay Canoe

           Polo

X6     Canoe Polo Hawkes Bay, Tri Club, Boot camp FCC, Sport Hawkes Bay 

Number of schools that utilise the facility for Physical Education

X9

X10

Number of schools that utilise the pool for school swim sports day

X5

X2

Number of Patrons over  12 months (1/3/18 – 28/2/19)

 

36,278 people

 

33,026 people

 

2.9       A new initiative implemented this year is the boot camp style programme in collaboration between Flaxmere Aquatics, Flaxmere Gym and the Flaxmere Community Centre.   There have been in total 110 participating in this trial programme which is designed to engage Flaxmere residents in physical training that includes running, swimming and body weights over four training sessions per week.  Benefits of this programme include improving health, reducing likelihood of disease such as diabetes, heart disease and stroke, building self-esteem and strengthening relationship through interaction with other individuals and/or team mates. 

2.10    Usage Sessional Pools

2.11    Frimley and Village pools have again enjoyed another popular season with many families in the weekends packing chilly bins full of food and beverage to enjoy a day in the sun and water.    A number of clubs and schools utilise these pools for outdoor training and the opportunity to use the large 50m pool.  In January a major CrossFit event used the 50m at Frimley Pool for one of their key competition challenges.

 

 

Frimley Pool

Village Pool

Number of competitive swim clubs

 

x2            Sun Devils,     

                Aqua Hawkes 

X1     Havelock North    

          Swim Club

Number of clubs

X2       Kiwi KidsTriathlons

            WeetBix Holiday         

            Programmes

X2     Ocean Beach Surf,    

         Waimarama Surf

Number of schools of providers  that utilise the facility for Physical Education

X6

X8     Havelock  North

          Primary

          Little Magpies

          Daycare

          Elim Kids

          YMCA

          GreenMeadows

          Afterschool Care

          KasCare

          Hilton Brown

          Kids Friendly Care         

Number of schools that utilise the pool for school swim sports day

X13

X3     Te Mata Primary

          Lucknow Primary

          Havelock North

          Intermediate

Number of Patrons

2017/18

2018/19

2017/18

2018/19

16173

people

15,804 people

22,767

people

8,655 people

 

2.12    Staffing

2.13    Village and Frimley summer season pools opened mid November 2018 with staff selected from applicants typically seeking holiday employment at the completion of the school and University year. 

2.14    At the end of February many of the staff employed at these two pools moved out of the district and returned to University, full time study, OE’s or/and permanent employment. 

2.15    Historically the majority of applications for employment across the four pools are from female under the age 25.  This is reflected in our current composition of 37 pool staff where 57% of this seasons staff were 25 years of age or younger.

2.16    Gender comparisons is that 86% of our team are female and 14% are male.

2.17    Flaxmere Aquatics and Clive pools continued business as usual with permanent staff employed on a full or part time basis.  

 

2.18    This season has been a struggle to staff the seasonal pools (and Splash) once the schools and University’s commenced.  Health and Safety requirements around chemical handling, First Aid etc Managers have had to rely on permanent staff from Flaxmere and Clive as well as Napier Councils facilities to support while processing new employees (including induction and training requirements).

 

2.19    This issue will be reviewed over the next 3 months and actions implemented to ensure that 2019/20 runs a lot smoother. This will include reviewing the hourly rate for this diverse and complex working environment.

 

Kaitiaki

2.20    This season both Village, Frimley and Flaxmere pools had Kaitiaki for support and assistance should the need arise.  This was a welcoming improvement from last year where static guards were used at Frimely Pool.

 

2.21    Kaitiaki was introduced at Village after an incident where one of our younger staff members was assaulted while trying to protect two tamariki.

 

2.22    The positive impact on antisocial behaviour was immediate and welcomed by not only other users of the facilities but also on our pool staff, surrounding business and facilities.

 

2.23    The City Assist Team were also frequent visitors to all our facilities over the summer season and a positive support, welcome by many.

 

3.0       MAINTENANCE

 

3.1       Water Treatment

 

3.2       With the failure of the water treatment system at Village Pool and ongoing issues with the system at Clive Pool Officers have been working with the Assets Team (water and maintenance), the Health and Safety Team and the Manager of Splash to investigate a better option for all Council Pools.

3.3       Installation of a new dosing system that utilises sodium hypochlorite solution (similar to what is used at Splash Planet) instead of the chlorine gas disinfection system is a safer option and does not require the level of training and qualifications of staff.

3.4       Clive War Memorial Pool which has this system will be upgraded.

 

3.5       The remaining pools will undergoing the decommissioning of the chlorine gas disinfection system and installation of a new dosing system will commence at the end of the summer season (April 2019). This will mean shutting down Flaxmere Aquatics for a week which has already been scheduled and advertised. There will be no impact on the remaining three pools.

 

4.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

 

4.1       Under the Councils Policy on Significance this matter is deemed to have a low   level of significance.

 

6.0    RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A.      That the report of the Community Facilities Manager titled Pools Update dated 9/04/2019 be received.

B.     That Officers complete a full review of the 2018/19 Summer Season       for Frimley and Village Pools and report back to Council on the          findings.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/323

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Community Safety Co-ordinator

Debbie Northe

SUBJECT:                    Safer Hastings Coalition Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       This report contributes to the achievement of the Council’s community outcomes and specific Council objectives as set out in the Long Term Plan 2018-28 by:

·    Safe, multi-functional urban centres

·    People are safe from crime

·    Reducing public nuisance and threats to public health and safety

 

1.2       The purpose of this report is to update the Committee about the activities of the Safer Hastings Coalition.

1.3       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.4       The objective of this decision relevant to the purpose of Local Government is to meet the current and future needs of communities through the provision of local public services focused on creating and maintaining safe communities.

1.5       This report concludes by recommending that the report be received.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       Hastings became an accredited Safer Community (Safer Hastings) in 2013. 

2.2       Safer Hastings is a coalition of more than 20 agencies and organisations that are working together to make the Hastings community one where people can go about their daily activities in an environment without fear, risk of harm or injury.

2.3       Hastings District Council (Council) is the lead agency for the Safer Hastings coalition and fulfils the role of Chair, Safer Hastings.  A new Community Safety Coordinator was employed in July 2018 and is responsible for the coordination of Safer Hastings.  This coordination role had been vacant since May 2017.

2.4       Safer Hastings has the following focus areas:

 

Target Environment

Target Groups

Home

Youth

Road

Older people

Public spaces

Low income families

   Contributing factors: Alcohol, drugs, gambling addictions

 

2.5       The Safer Community Foundation of New Zealand (SCFNZ) annual online survey was completed in August 2018.  Very positive feedback was received. Letter is attached (Attachment 1).  Refer to 3.8 of this paper for key achievements following this feedback.

2.6       A Safer Hastings coalition workshop was held on 4 October 2018 at the Havelock North Function Centre. The purpose of the workshop was to review activities over the past 2 years, and identify priorities going forward.  This was done by reviewing the 2016 – 2018 Implementation Plan, identifying current community safety issues and coalition opportunities, and then determining priorities under the current 5 Strategic Goals. 40 people, representing 27 different organisations, agencies and communities attended including community plan leaders from Cape Coast, Whakatu, Flaxmere and Maraekakaho. 

2.7       There was a willingness to progress workshop actions, and not lose momentum.  Workshop outcomes have informed the creation of the 2019 Implementation Plan which was endorsed at the Safer Hastings coalition meeting in January 2019.  As a result, previous strategic goals were changed; Strategic Goal 2 from “Safe, healthy homes” to “Safe in my home”                  and Strategic Goal 4 from “”People in Hastings feel safe” to “Safe in my community”. A copy of the implementation plan is attached (Attachment 2).

2.8       Over the past 8 months, the Community Safety Coordinator has engaged with all existing strategic partners and support agencies.  New relationships have been formed with Grey Power, Volunteering Hawke’s Bay, Emerge Aotearoa, Dad’s HB, Health Protection Agency, Citizens Advice Bureau and the  Prisoner Aid Rehabilitation Society

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       Councillor Eileen Lawson is the current Chair of Safer Hastings.

3.2       Safer Hastings activities are currently working towards 5 Strategic Goals being:                    

-     Connected agencies and communities

-     Safe in my home

-     Safe roads

-     Safe in my community

-     People are free from addiction related harm

3.3       RE-ACCREDITATION - Safer Hastings is due for re-accreditation as a Safer Community having been in operation for 5 years. A reaccreditation working group comprising Council, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), Hawke’s Bay District Health Board (HBDHB), Health Hawke’s Bay (HHB) and Te Puni Kokiri (TPK) has been formed to complete the re-accreditation process and will meet on 27 March to progress the application. SCFNZ has indicated September 2019 as a tentative date for the re-accreditation visit.  HBDHB have committed to funding the $2,000 reaccreditation fee.

3.4       At the request of the coalition, an annual report is being produced retrospectively to report on activities for the period 1 January 2017 to 30 June 2018.  This 18 month reporting period reflects the reporting change from calendar year to financial year. The draft report is attached (Attachment 3).

3.5       A Safer Hastings coalition workshop is scheduled for May 2019 and will be held at the Camberley Community Centre.  The purpose of the workshop is to bring together agencies to determine priorities to inform the creation of a 3 year implementation plan for 2020 – 2022.  This plan will support the re-accreditation application.

3.6       At the 2018 workshop it was agreed to resurrect the “Focus Group” concept to progress the Implementation Plan and subsequent work streams.  The “Older Persons” focus group has reconvened and subsequently met twice.  The group are planning a Positive Ageing Forum to be held in Flaxmere during Elder Abuse Awareness week in June 2019.

3.7       A Safer Hastings communication plan is being developed to promote the coalition and its activities.  This includes the creation of a Safer Hastings brand. A quarterly newsletter has been developed, the first issue dated December 2018 is attached (Attachment 4). Tear drop banners have been purchased and were displayed for the first time at the International Women’s Day event. A photograph is attached (Attachment 5).  Further marketing collateral is being sourced which will be made available to all coalition partners to utilise at events.

3.8       Key achievements of Safer Hastings over the past 6 months include:

-     White Ribbon campaign: public pledge signing event and White Ribbon riders visit to Camberley Community Centre

-     Coalition workshop

-     IronMāori Kaumātua event with Safer Napier

-     Gambling awareness week – “pause the pokies”

-     New look newsletter

-     Engagement with new agencies

-     Resurrection of focus group

-     International Women’s Day Event – celebrating diversity in the Emergency Services

-     Engagement with rural communities – presence at Maraekakaho Community Fair

3.9       Next steps – the key priorities for Safer Hastings going forward are:

-      Coalition workshop in May

-     Create and agree on Implementation Plan 2020 - 2022

-      Host Positive Ageing Forum in June

-      Complete reaccreditation application

-     Reaccreditation ceremony

4.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

4.1       The decision sought in this report does not trigger the Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

5.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Community Safety Co-ordinator titled Safer Hastings Coalition Update dated 9/04/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

 

1

Safer Hastings 2018 Feedback from Safer Communities Foundation NZ

COP-03-06-03-19-324

 

2

Safer Hastings Implementation Plan 2019

COP-03-06-03-19-327

 

3

Draft - Safer Hastings 2018 Annual Report

COP-03-06-03-19-329

 

4

Safer Hastings Newsletter Dec 2018

COP-03-06-03-19-317

 

5

Safer Hastings tear drop banner Internatlonal Womens Day 2019

COP-03-06-03-19-325

 

 

 

 


Safer Hastings 2018 Feedback from Safer Communities Foundation NZ

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Safer Hastings Implementation Plan 2019

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Draft - Safer Hastings 2018 Annual Report

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Safer Hastings Newsletter Dec 2018

Attachment 4

 

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Safer Hastings tear drop banner Internatlonal Womens Day 2019

Attachment 5

 

 

 



File Ref: 19/329

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Splash Planet Manager

Peran Hutchings

SUBJECT:                    Splash Planet Update        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       This reports contributes to the achievement of the Council’s community outcomes and specific Council objectives as set out in the Long Term Plan 2018-28 by:

·      Places and spaces for recreation

·      Appealing visitor destination

·      Fostering recreational participation

 

1.2       The purpose of this report is to update and inform the Committee about Splash Planet’s 2018/19 summer season.

1.3       This report arises from a request by Councillors to receive regular updates on activities at Splash Planet during the summer season.

1.4       Splash Planet reopens for the coming summer season on 12 November 2019 for seven days a week operation until 6 February 2020. The facility is then opened weekends only until 29 March 2020.

1.5       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.6       The report addresses the operation of Splash Planet in terms of the provision of a local public service and associated infrastructure that is required to meet the needs and aspirations of the local community for aquatic facilities.

1.7       This report concludes by recommending that the report from the Splash Planet manager, titled “Splash Planet Update” dated 9 April 2019 be received.

2.0       CURRENT SITUATION

2.1       Splash Planet had over 400 applications to fill 75 roles at the water based Theme Park. Of these applications 50% were staff returning from the previous season/seasons.

2.2       There was an increase in staffing from 70 in the previous year to 75 due to the Splash Planet Manager employing Kaitiaki rather than contracting static guards. This approach had a positive impact on visitor’s experiences and welcomed by staff.

2.3       Splash Planet opened its doors for the season on 12 November 2019. All staff come together the prior week, (for a week) to participate in an induction programme to cover off necessary training requirements to ensure they can satisfactorily for-fill their roles and deliver quality services. 

2.4       Training includes but are not limited to Lifeguard training, Emergency Evacuation, Health and Safety induction, Customer Service training, Policies and Procedures, Operations Manual for each area, Food handling, Dry rides certification and First Aid.

2.5       The makeup of staff for the main part of the summer season is 45 female and 30 male.  The average age for female staff is 19-20 and for males, (removing the 5 Kaitiaki Staff) is 21.

2.6       Similar to the seasonal pools, staffing the facility once University goes back has been difficult. Attracting weekends only staffing has been an issue now for the last three years. Finding people with the level of qualifications and skills needed is becoming increasingly hard.

2.7       However, on the positive note Ngati Kahungunu Iwi day was once again a huge day, with 3177 in the park for their Annual AGM and sports day. 

2.8       Busiest day of the summer season this year was once again Saturday of Wellington Anniversary Day, with over 3424 customers using Splash Planet.

2.9       Peak attendance levels from Boxing Day through to the end of January continue to place pressure on infrastructure within the park.  January 2019 was the busiest month we have had, with 55,212 customers attending Splash Planet.

2.10    Attendance to the 24 March 2019 is currently 112,289 very similar to the last few summer seasons.

 

 

 

2.11    The food and beverage outlets and the Gift Shop continue to perform well, with an increased focus on fresh healthy options driven by sales.  These are area’s Splash Planet will continue to work on and develop.

2.12    Splash Planet once again achieved POOLSAFE accreditation.  This means we have fully qualified and well trained lifeguards, a high standard of water quality, robust Health and Safety Systems and engage in best practice policy and procedures within the industry.  It is managed and assessed by New Zealand Recreation Association.

2.13    Splash Planet implemented online ticketing options this summer.  This was hugely successful. The team will continue to work towards improving the system to ensure the facility has a robust solution to address some of the glitches.

2.14    The online ticketing programme has been a joint venture between Napier City Council, Hastings IT team and the Splash Planet management. The financial gains by implementing this system will be reported to Council as part of the end of year financial reporting process.

2.15    Councils Communications team, IT team and the Splash Planet Management team also implemented an upgraded web-site which was also very successful.

2.16    For the period 12 November 2018 – 24 March 2019, page views of the Splash Planet website were 490,312 (+64.6% on the same period in 2017/2018) while total sessions increased by 6.7% to 127,274. As a point of comparison, the HDC website had 413,980 page views for this same period.

2.17    The Splash Planet Facebook page is by the far the most popular of all the council-owned pages. As of 24 March 2019, page ‘likes’ numbered 24,701    (+2,348 since 25 March 2018). As a point of comparison, the HDC Facebook page had 15,435 ‘likes’ as of 24 March 2019.

3.0       GROWTH STRATEGY

3.1       Improving car parking and access to the park is of a high priority as Management have recorded or observed a number of near-misses and incidents.

3.2       Improvements to this space was highlighted in the Splash Planet Growth Strategy which will be coming to Council for endorsement in May 2019.

3.3       In the meantime Officers have made an application to the Tourism Fund to make necessary improvements which will not only benefit Splash Planet but also Windsor Park (as identified in the Windsor Park Management Plan).

3.4       Once the Splash Planet Growth Strategy has been endorsed, a project team will be developed to firstly develop a plan of priorities (including financials) to ensure delivery can be implemented over a 5 to 10 year period. 

4.0       SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

4.1       Under the Councils Policy on Significance this matter is deemed to have a low level of significance.

 

5.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Splash Planet Manager titled Splash Planet Update dated 9/04/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


File Ref: 19/267

 

 

REPORT TO:               Community Development Committee

MEETING DATE:        Tuesday 9 April 2019

FROM:                           Youth Development Co-ordinator

Angela Hughes

SUBJECT:                    Hastings District Youth Council 2019        

 

 

1.0       SUMMARY

1.1       This reports contributes to the achievement of the Council’s community outcomes and specific Council objectives as set out in the Long Term Plan 2018-28 by:

·    Assisting youth in education, skill development and jobs

·    Putting people at the centre of planning and service

1.2       The Council is required to give effect to the purpose of local government as prescribed by Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002. That purpose is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost–effective for households and businesses. Good quality means infrastructure, services and performance that are efficient and effective and appropriate to present and anticipated future circumstances.

1.2       Members of the Youth Council will be presenting to the Committee

1.3       This report concludes by recommending that the report titled “Hastings District Youth Council 2019” be received.

2.0       BACKGROUND

2.1       The Hastings Youth Council represents the voices of young people in Hastings and provides valuable input to Council on the needs of young people.

2.2       Positions for the Hastings Youth Council are advertised annually in February/March through local high schools, community groups, Facebook and at Council facilities.

2.3       Applications are made online through the Hastings District Council website. When submissions are closed the applications are reviewed by a panel made up of Hastings District Council Youth Development staff and the Councillor appointed to the Youth Council.

2.4       The 2019 recruitment process included two significant changes. The age of eligibility was increased from 15-21 years old, in previous years it was 15-19 years old.

2.5       The second change involved selecting a shortlist of applicants who were then required to attend a 10 minute interview with the selection panel at Hastings District Council.

2.6       17 interviews were held over two days of which 11 candidates were chosen to join the 2019 Hastings Youth Council.

2.7       Four members from the 2018 Youth Council chose to continue into 2019, which created the total of 15 members for the 2019 Youth Council.

2.8       A two day training and planning retreat was held in March. The group elected leadership roles including the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson. The group also worked together to determine the Youth Councils priorities for the year and develop their Annual Plan of activities, campaigns and events.

3.0       CURRENT SITUATION

3.1       The 2019 Hastings Youth Council is made up of 15 young people aged between 15-17 years old who live, work or attend school in the Hastings District. Membership list below.

           

Kate Allen – Chairperson

Hastings Girls High School

Charliot Miller  - Deputy Chairperson

Havelock North High School

Pelerose Vaima’a

Hastings Girls High School

Kathleen Steffert

Hastings Girls High School

Eva Harper

Hastings Girls High School

Gurjas Sekhon

St Johns College

Louis Gaffaney

St Johns College

Oscar Malpas

Hastings Boys High School

Ondre Hapuku-Lambert

Karamu High School

Sophie Jones

Karamu High School

Boston Wynyard

Karamu High School

Daisy Hill

Iona College

Janicka Tei

Taradale High School

Ashleigh Keenan

Sacred Heart Girls College

James McPhail

Lindisfarne College

3.2       The Hastings District Council’s website includes a group photo of the 2019 Hastings Youth Council, as well as individual photos and short paragraphs about the members to accompany the photo. Youth Council members were asked:

-     why they wanted to join the Youth Council,

-     what they hope to achieve by the end of the year

-     what they hope to be doing in the future.

3.3       These photographs and bios will be featured on the Youth Council’s Facebook page during March and April as a way of promoting the Youth Council to the wider community.

3.4       Official Youth Council meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month in the Council Chambers from 3.30 to 5:30pm.

3.5       The draft Terms of Reference has been amended to reflect the 2019 group and the way they wish to work together.

3.6       The draft Terms of Reference include short job descriptions, meeting protocols and obligations. They will be included in the official agenda of each Youth Council meeting.

3.7       Each member of the Youth Council will be required to submit a short report detailing their activities and engagements for the month. This will include progress reports on Youth Council projects, other youth projects and community projects the Youth Council are involved in and/or support.

3.8       The draft Terms of Reference were ratified at the Youth Council’s first official meeting held 3 April 2019.

 

            2019 Youth Council Annual Plan

3.9       The Youth Council have created a draft 2019 Annual Plan to work to that details the Youth Council’s activities and commitments for the year.

3.10    The group has chosen to focus their attention on creating a diverse range of campaigns, activities and events for young people to engage with community and Council.

3.11    It is hoped that through these activities the Youth Council will be able to address issues of importance such as:

-     mental health and wellbeing

-     diversity and inclusion, and

-     environmental suitability

3.12    The Youth Council will present their Annual Plan to the Committee.

 

The “Brain Dump” Pop up youth engagement sessions held in the Hastings CBD

3.13    The Youth Council hosted two “Brain Dump” youth engagement sessions in the Hastings CBD, Wednesday and Thursday 20/21st of March.

3.14    These sessions allowed young people to engage with the Youth Council to   express their concerns, priorities and their ideas for projects and events to improve Hastings for young people.

3.15    The Brain Dump resulted in over 150 young people engaging with Youth Council members and contributing 375 opinions and ideas. This information will help support further engagement opportunities and Youth Council activities.

3.16    A formal evaluation process of the Brain Dump, including collating the data gathered and discussing future projects and activities was held at the official Youth Council meeting held 3 April 2019.

             Engagement

3.17    Throughout March the Hastings Youth Council uploaded several posts including announcing the 2019 Youth Council members and promotion of the Brain Dump pop up youth engagement sessions in the Hastings CBD.

3.18    That resulted in an increase of 300+ likes on the Hastings Youth Council’s Facebook page, over 3600 engagements with the page, and over 4165 people reached.

3.19    That is a significant increase in traffic through the Youth Council Facebook page that has not been seen in previous years.

4.0       RECOMMENDATIONS AND REASONS

A)        That the report of the Youth Development Co-ordinator titled Hastings District Youth Council 2019 dated 9/04/2019 be received.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.